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topic: Greg Dinauer

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Krys' Drogue Incident 8-15-21

Thu, Oct 7 2021, 10:43:50 pm MDT

New and untested chute

bridle|drogue|Greg Dinauer|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Larry Bunner|Moyes RX 3.5|triangle

Larry Bunner reports:

On 8-15-21 Krys Grzyb and Greg Dinauer set an 83km triangle task from Twin Oaks airport in Whitewater, WI east to East Troy, northwest to McDermott airport and then southwest back to Twin Oaks. Greg aborted the task early and flew back to the airport. Krys was doing well getting over 5200’agl on nine climbs. He tagged the first two turn-points and was headed back to the airport.

To this point he had been in the air for 2hr 15min of which over 1½ hours was above 4200’. The winds were 5-9mph from the southeast. Sustained climbs over 1000’ were averaging about 350fpm with one climb averaging 770fpm. He found a thermal just past the last turnpoint 18km out and climbed 300 feet to ~4400’. He needed about a 12:1 glide to get back with a crossing tail wind. He confidently left the last climb knowing he could make it and even if he hit increased sink, he would hit a thermal soon enough.

He went on a long glide sinking over 300fpm and was soon down below 1000’. He selected a narrow field of grass along a farm for his LZ. Approaching from the southeast at 500’ he unzipped the drogue pouch and began extracting it from the pocket. His intent was to deploy it near the ground but the drogue slipped away and accidentally deployed.

Immediately the glider turned right and his sink rate increased to 600+fpm. He pulled in on the control bar, the glider began to pitch down and the sink rate increased to over 900fpm (peak). Thinking the drogue malfunctioned, he reached back to grab the bridle but couldn’t find it. He instantly began to correct for the turning dive. With extreme effort the glider rounded out pointing downwind and just above the corn. The glider, slowed somewhat by the corn, whacked in hard but the glider and Kris were miraculously unharmed. Pretty shaken, he called to the airport to get a retrieve; Greg and Chico showed up quickly to help get the equipment out of the corn.

Krys has used a drogue chute for many years. This particular drogue was developed to train runners to improve their speed. It has one long bridle that runs back to the chute shroud lines. These lines are short relative to the length of the bridle. He used this type of chute for several years with the drogue deploying aft of the keel. This spring he purchased a new drogue from a different manufacturer and replaced his old worn one. He did not compare bridle lengths before installation. Up to this flight the new drogue had not been tested/deployed. After landing, Kris discovered that the keel had penetrated between the shroud lines and the drogue was affixed/centered around the keel.

The bridle length was a couple inches shorter than his previous drogue. When the drogue accidentally deployed, the position of the drogue effectively provided a lifting surface on the end of the keel. When the control bar was pulled in to increase sink rate, the forces on the aft end of the keel decreased the nose angle further thus progressively increasing the sink rate (to the point the nose was pointed at the ground). It took close to all of Krys’ strength to push the bar out far enough to overcome the resistance to level out the glider before entering the tall corn.

In the moment, he focused entirely on recovering the glider turn and descent and felt there wasn’t enough time or altitude to throw his main parachute. His Moyes RX 3.5 sprogs were at the factory settings. Corrective actions that Krys has taken or intends to take include: shorten bridle to prevent keel interaction, add an extra line to one of the shrouds and the harness loop to give access to the pilot to deflate the drogue, and adding a drogue release so the drogue can be cut loose from the pilot.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Tue, Sep 28 2021, 8:50:00 pm MDT

What a great competition

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Almost every one had an extremely fun time flying in Casa Grande last week. Six days out of seven were flown. It was great that we didn't fly the one day that we didn't. Rain on the day after. Rain on the day before.

Really enjoyed the day that we flew in the weakest conditions. Really enjoyed the day Zac and I climbed so high and just finished much faster than anyone else.

Task calls were very appropriate for the limited number of hours of daylight in late September.

We had great support from the volunteers especially at the launch. Launch conditions were excellent.

Scoring was very rapid and it was taking place remotely in Colombia. The trackers worked great after the first day (don't know what caused the problem on the first day).

You can review the races here: https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog__day_7 with Replay.

Day seven is quite interesting: https://airtribune.com/play/5526/2d

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sat, Sep 25 2021, 11:33:56 pm MDT

Day 7, task 6, narrative

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

The task:

My flight:

I hang on this time behind Bobby Bailey and he finally flies straight and to a turning pilot. I join up and there is a reasonable amount of lift around (less than 200 fpm). The pilots climb up together and we get to 6,300' a couple of times before taking the second clock at 2:15 PM. We are all outside the start cylinder and have to go back to get the second start time.

We all head out together and there are little bits of lift here and there but not much worth turning in. I make a few turns then head for Casa Grande Mountain and not finding anything there keep going east to the spot where I found good lift before when I came in second for the day. We've got an north northwest wind, the same as on that previous day, and I'm looking to get away from the hill, sort of in the lee and over some clear looking field.

At 1,600' AGL I find the lift and climb to 6,600' drifting in a 9 mph north northwest wind toward the first turnpoint. I nick the turnpoint and head southwest toward the Baker turnpoint. The few pilots that I see are quite a ways below me.

I quickly find more lift and climb to 6,500' before it gives out. I find good lift again and climb to 6,700' in a 15 mph northwest wind. The lift has been easy to find and the climbs, while not great, are plenty strong enough. I want to be high going into the hills before Baker.

I can see three gliders ahead lower than me but near the turnpoint and climbing, or at least circling. At the base of the hills I stop to get as high as possible climbing to 6,100' before heading into the turnpoint. A few pilots in front are turning a bit lower than I. I don't see Robin higher.

I hit the turnpoint and climb to 5,800' and then head north with Pete Lehmann just to my west. I had seen two pilots heading north very low as I came into the turnpoint. Probably Zac and Phil.

I'm heading into a 9 mph north northwest wind but it looks good ahead with wide open fields that look like they are hot. But, the sink is bad, averaging 400 fpm down, with spots of 900 fpm down.

I turn east to get out of the sink and out of Indian territory, but it does no good. I'm looking all over but soon find myself on the ground with Tyler right behind me.

Robin got to 7,600' at the second turnpoint and was down to 1,500' AGL heading north. He didn't get any substantial lift until he got to Arizona City. He was the only one to make it to goal.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sat, Sep 25 2021, 10:44:18 pm MDT

Day 7, task 6 results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Bill Soderquest|Butch Peachy|Davis Straub|Greg Kendall|Jason Boehm|Jd Guillemette|John Simon|Konstantin Lukyanov|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Phill Bloom|Ric Caylor|Robin Hamilton|Tyler Borradaile|Willy Dydo|Zac Majors

Bill Soderquest|Butch Peachy|competition|Davis Straub|Greg Kendall|Jason Boehm|Jd Guillemette|John Simon|Konstantin Lukyanov|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Phill Bloom|Ric Caylor|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Tyler Borradaile|Willy Dydo|Zac Majors

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 6 (open):

# Name Glider Time
(h:m:s)
Distance
(km)
Total
1 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 03:01:54 81.73 1000.0
2 Bill Soderquest Ww T3 63.95 764.9
3 Jason Boehm Wills Wing T3 60.35 736.1
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 59.67 731.2
5 Jd Guillemette Moyes RX3.5 57.07 704.1
6 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 55.26 686.4
7 Butch Peachy Moyes RX 3.5/S4 54.55 677.8
8 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 53.06 655.4
9 Ric Caylor Moyes RX5 Pro 52.78 649.9
10 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 52.13 641.8
11 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 52.25 640.3

Final:

# Name Glider T 1 T 2 T 3 T 4 T 5 T 6 Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 977.8 988.7 927.1 820.1 77.7 420.0 4211
2 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 766.7 930.0 573.5 699.5 117.2 466.4 3553
3 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 843.0 917.0 776.6 423.9 45.5 470.9 3477
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 672.5 832.3 763.4 211.0 102.2 731.2 3313
5 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 295.2 510.0 795.3 514.6 117.9 1000.0 3233
6 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 739.6 566.6 732.3 410.5 0.0 655.4 3104
7 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 984.8 200.1 577.8 512.0 145.4 641.9 3062
8 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 457.5 489.0 845.1 702.6 75.8 451.5 3022
9 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 792.2 243.0 378.3 680.6 162.0 686.4 2943
10 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 794.9 253.3 886.8 226.0 117.6 640.4 2919

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sat, Sep 25 2021, 8:59:40 am MDT

Day 6, task 5 results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Bill Soderquest|Davis Straub|Greg Kendall|Jeff Chipman|John Simon|Konstantin Lukyanov|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Owen Morse|Phill Bloom|Rob Cooper|Robin Hamilton|Tyler Borradaile|Willy Dydo|Zac Majors

Bill Soderquest|competition|Davis Straub|Greg Kendall|Jeff Chipman|John Simon|Konstantin Lukyanov|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Owen Morse|Phill Bloom|Rob Cooper|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Tyler Borradaile|Willy Dydo|Zac Majors

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 5 (open):

# Name Glider Distance
(km)
Total
1 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 34.30 162.0
2 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 29.85 145.4
3 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 19.44 117.9
4 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 19.36 117.6
5 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 19.24 117.2
6 Bill Soderquest Ww T3 18.23 112.6
7 Jeff Chipman Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 18.17 112.3
8 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 16.53 102.2
9 Rob Cooper Wills Wing T2C 15.97 98.3
10 Owen Morse Wills Wing T3 154 12.29 78.7

Cumulative:

# Name Glider T 1 T 2 T 3 T 4 T 5 Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 977.8 988.7 927.1 820.1 77.7 3791
2 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 766.7 930.0 573.5 699.5 117.2 3087
3 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 843.0 917.0 776.6 423.9 45.5 3006
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 672.5 832.3 763.4 211.0 102.2 2581
5 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 457.5 489.0 845.1 702.6 75.8 2570
6 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 739.6 566.6 732.3 410.5 0.0 2449
7 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 984.8 200.1 577.8 512.0 145.4 2420
8 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 794.9 253.3 886.8 226.0 117.6 2279
9 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 792.2 243.0 378.3 680.6 162.0 2256
10 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 295.2 510.0 795.3 514.6 117.9 2233

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Fri, Sep 24 2021, 9:14:50 pm MDT

Day 6, task 5

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

After the gust, the upper level clouds covered the sky. The pilot briefing was postponed twice to 12:30 PM from 10:30 AM. The clouds were still there but there was a little bit of blue way off to the east.

The task committee has tasks for both classes and after significant discussion about whether there would be any lift, Jamie says the task is on with a late launch. I have to setup my glider and get out there quickly.

The Sport Class launches first and soon they are all on the ground. Open class pilots are reluctant to launch once again after they see no one sticking.

A few of us get in line and I line up behind Robin Hamilton. It is already after the first start clock at 3:30 PM.

Bobby Bailey pulls me up and find lift just to the west. He makes some quick turns, the line goes slack and then the quick link breaks when the line goes tight again. I'm off at 844' AGL on a very weak day.

But, Bobby had been turning because there was lift there so I went to find it right away and starting climbing at 63 fpm with a 10 mph wind out of the west pushing me down the course line.

Went back up wind after climbing to 1,250' AGL drifting toward the resort. Found nothing but sink, went back east to get in the same line I had been in and found 6 fpm. Five minutes later I was able to move a little to the south and found 50 fpm climbing to 1,600' AGL

By now a few other pilots came and joined me and we just circled and circled drifting down the course line. We continue circling and climb to 1,900' AGL. We drift 9.5 km and take 50 minutes. It's 4:31 PM and the sun is getting close to the clouds in the west.

With the wind blowing at 10 mph out of the west northwest another pilot, likely to be Konstantin, and I head out. I'm able to find 100 fpm and four pilots join me. Heading out again I find 20 fpm to 1,800' AGL with the pilots still following.

After that there is not much as we stretch it out past the intersection of I8 and I10. Robin, Phil and I land in the same field.

Willie Dydo went out earlier and got the furthest on his own. Tyler got to ten kilometers past us. The sun was behind the clouds at this point.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Fri, Sep 24 2021, 11:37:52 am MDT

Gust front in the morning on Friday

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|weather

Five of us were out by the launch area standing by our gliders as the gust front came through. Lasted probably fifteen minutes.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Thu, Sep 23 2021, 5:31:20 pm MDT

Day five, no task, day is cancelled

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|video

Greg Kendall|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|video

competition|Greg Kendall|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|video

competition|Greg Kendall|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|video

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

JD was measuring the south wind at 14 mph gusting to 22 mph. Lots of blowing dust in the field, which is quite discouraging. No pilots were willing to launch (other than Bill Bennett). Lots of task and launch time changes to no avail. That doesn't even count the cu-nimb that was forming over the second turnpoint (which the task and safety committees weren't noticing).

Meet director cancels the day as it gets later and later.

Bill Bennett launches after the day is canceled.

Note about the third task.

Replay, https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog__day_3, shows that it was the fact that Zac and I climbed to over 9,000' that determined the outcome for that day.

Zac left a gaggle east of Casa Grande mountain where he was at the bottom to come joined Pete Lehmann and I climbing faster to his south. Four pilots (excluding Greg Kendall, who took an earlier clock) were out ahead of us and high and doing well. While they got to the turnpoint first and headed back before we did, we were able to climb the highest 4 km before the turnpoint. This gave us a big advantage.

Phil and Tyler got stuck low coming back. We were 500 to 1000 meters higher than Simon and Hamilton. Soon only Simon was ahead and he got a bit low east of the mountain coming back. We came into the south end of the mountain high and quickly climbed. Robin was just to our east but not climbing nearly as well.

We climbed to over 2,500 meters and went on final glide to goal while everyone else was working to get up or stay up.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Wed, Sep 22 2021, 9:40:23 pm MDT

Day four, task four, results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Greg Kendall|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|Greg Kendall|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|Greg Kendall|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 4 (open):

# Name Glider Distance
(km)
Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 70.89 820.1
2 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 54.69 702.6
3 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 54.10 699.5
4 Ric Caylor Moyes RX5 Pro 54.13 698.4
5 Gary Anderson Wills Wing T3 144 54.02 697.2
6 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 52.75 680.6
7 Jd Guillemette Moyes RX3.5 51.60 662.1
8 Ian Snowball Moyes RS4.5 47.64 592.9
9 Rob Cooper Wills Wing T2C 40.79 518.7
10 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 40.06 514.6

Cumulative:

# Name Glider T 1 T 2 T 3 T 4 Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 977.8 988.7 927.1 820.1 3714
2 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 766.7 930.0 573.5 699.5 2970
3 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 843.0 917.0 776.6 423.9 2961
4 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 457.5 489.0 845.1 702.6 2494
5 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 672.5 832.3 763.4 211.0 2479
6 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 739.6 566.6 732.3 410.5 2449
7 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 984.8 200.1 577.8 512.0 2275
8 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 794.9 253.3 886.8 226.0 2161
9 Gary Anderson Wills Wing T3 144 727.3 568.6 139.8 697.2 2133
10 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 295.2 510.0 795.3 514.6 2115

Neither Sport or Open Class pilots make goal.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Wed, Sep 22 2021, 6:47:03 pm MDT

Day four, task four, narrative

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

The Task:

With the wind blowing 11 mph out of the south southeast at launch the task committee, at the last minute, changes the task to first send us out to the northwest to the edge of the mountains north of the sailplane port at Estrella, west of Maricopa and then back to the hotel when the winds are forecasted to lighten up.

Having learned their lesson the Sport Class pilots are happy to let us Open Class pilots go first and check out whether there is any lift or not. I launched sixth and Jim Prahl drug me around the sky not finding much and I worked -30 pm after pinning off at 2000' AGL. I leave that to find actual lift that overcomes my sink rate downwind to just south of the launch. 132 fpm is what I'm happy to be in.

Most of the thermals over the next hour in the start cylinder average less than 100 fpm, but I'm finally able to climb to 6,000' along with John Simon and Zac. Half a dozen pilots are near the top of the low stack and a few more are scrounging down below. Pilots are spread out looking around for better lift but little is to be found.

Unfortunately I was at 6,000' four minutes before the first start clock and lose 800' before the start gate opens and I head out. I'm following three pilots so it looks okay. I quickly find 100 fpm and climb to 5,500' before it peters out.

Heading to the northwest with John Simon and Jeff Galvin nearby I keep searching and not finding anything. Down to 300' AGL west of the stock yards I hit some lift and start turning. Jeff lands below me and John Simon is just as low in the next field to the north.

A few turns and the lift goes away no doubt pushed to the northwest toward the power lines at the edge of the field. I don't see John working his way up in the field on the other side of the power lines. Soon I have to land making a safe and graceful return to earth.

It isn't long before we see a gaggle of four pilots circling right up over us. Another pilot lands with us and then Willie Dydo comes in at 300' and proceeds to climb up and out. Another pilot lands in the field to our north.

Looking from our balcony on the sixth floor of the hotel I don't see anyone at goal. The Sport Class also had an out and return task to the southeast. I saw one Swift that looks like it made it back.

So close (this is where the guys out front get low for the first time):

I'm at 280' AGL finding lift, but not enough. Zac and John find lift north of the highway and climb up.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Wed, Sep 22 2021, 1:16:09 am MDT

Day three, task 3, Results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Dinauer|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Dinauer|Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Dinauer|Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Greg Dinauer|Greg Kendall|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Cumulative:

# Name Glider T 1 T 2 T 3 Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 977.8 988.7 927.1 2894
2 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 843.0 917.0 776.6 2537
3 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 766.7 930.0 573.5 2270
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 672.5 832.3 763.4 2268
5 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 739.6 566.6 732.3 2039
6 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 794.9 253.3 886.8 1935
7 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 457.5 489.0 845.1 1792
8 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 984.8 200.1 577.8 1763
9 Greg Dinauer Aeros Combat 12 722.1 509.3 470.1 1702
10 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 295.2 510.0 795.3 1601

Four Sport Class pilots make it back to the hotel, Leonardo, Tim, LJ, and Sujeta, her first competition and first goal.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Tue, Sep 21 2021, 9:50:13 pm MDT

Day three, task 3, preliminary results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Greg Kendall|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Cumulative:

# Name Glider Time
(h:m:s)
Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 01:32:06 927.1
2 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 01:35:23 886.8
3 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 01:58:12 845.1
4 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 01:50:27 795.3
5 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 01:52:52 776.6
6 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 01:53:26 763.4
7 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 01:57:24 732.3
8 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 02:30:05 577.8
9 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 02:30:39 573.5
10 Gennadiy Khramov Wills Wing T2C 02:54:01 484.1

Four Sport Class pilots make it back to the hotel, Leonardo, Tim, LJ, and Sujeta, her first competition and first goal.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Tue, Sep 21 2021, 7:53:45 pm MDT

Day three, task 3, narrative and preliminary results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Greg Kendall|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Greg Kendall|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|Greg Kendall|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|Greg Kendall|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

The Task:

The Sport Class wanted to go before the Open Class today and they had a 12:30 PM launch time with the first start clock at 1 PM and a total of six start clocks. The Swifts would launch first before the Sport Class and the Open Class would launch after the Sport Class.

The Swifts and the Sport Class pilots were all towed up and they promptly all landed back at the launch area. This set the tone for the next couple of hours. Only a few Sport Class pilots wanted to relaunch right away and the Open Class pilots were reluctant to get going after seeing how no one was sticking.

The task committee shortened the Open Class task given that no one was launching and pushed back the start time fifteen minutes to 2:15 PM with four start times. The launch cylinder had been reduced to 3 km given the forecast for light winds. This proved not be that great an idea, at least for some of us.

The Open Class launch was open starting at 1 PM (or maybe 1:15) but only a couple of Sport Class pilots were willing to be towed. They quickly landed back at launch. Finally around 2 PM, Bill Bennett launched in Open Class and that finally got other pilots to consider the possibility. With an open launch and many pilots still reluctant to go, I launched third or fourth with Bobby Bailey towing. One tug, the 914 tug from Whitewater with Johnny Thompson towing, was out of commission.

Bobby tried his tight spiral (not that tight) on me and then must have seen some pilots thermaling up a few kilometers to the southeast and drug me over to them. It was nice to see pilots actually climbing. Bobby had reported earlier that no one was getting above their tow height.

The four of us climbed to 4,400' before the lift gave out and Greg Kendal, at least, headed out on the course. He might have the second clock as I was on tow at the first start clock at 2:15 pm.

A few of us went back to the northwest and hooked up with some light lift and a couple of extra pilots at about 1,300' AGL just southwest of the launch. It averaged less than 100 fpm.

With a 9 mph northwest wind we drifted back to the southeast as the third start time approached. At 2:45 PM (the third clock) I was still at less than 4,000' and getting close to the edge of the start cylinder. A few pilots had already drifted outside the cylinder. I was with two other pilots.

I moved over and was working 50 fpm as I crossed the start cylinder still drifting. Still at less than 4,000' I moved east half a kilometer, one kilometer outside the 3 km start cylinder and found 330 fpm, the best lift so far by a wide margin. Three of us worked it.

I was able to climb to 6,700' with two pilots just below me, 2.34 km outside the 3 km start cylinder. I sure was wishing we had a 5 km start cylinder at that point as I didn't want to go back to take the last clock from that far out. I took off at 15:02 for the Casa Grande Mountain.

Stopped for a few turns in 230 fpm as I passed three pilots who had been out ahead and then out to the mountain after a 13 km glide and a lot of sink right along its western edge. Found rough lift on the eastern side of the mountain that was rough at first with a north northwest wind at 5 mph.

At 300+ fpm I climbed up to 8,000' with Zac coming in below me, but climbing up to me. We headed out to the east southeast toward the turnpoint. I had only two very light layers on, a thin thermal shirt and speed sleeves, but the air was quite pleasant if a bit cool.

We quickly found more lift and then climbed at over 350 fpm to 9,100' just 4 km from the turnpoint. We turned back into the head wind (10 mph) found a little bit of lift then found 400 fpm again on the east side of Casa Grande mountain to 7,900' which made of a safe and easy glide 20 kilometers into goal even against a 10 mph north northwest head wind.


https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 3: open:

# Name Glider SS Time
(h:m:s)
Lead.
Points
Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 14:45:00 01:32:06 33.0 927.1
2 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 14:45:00 01:35:23 31.0 886.8
3 Greg Kendall Moyes RX 3.5 14:15:00 01:58:12 92.7 845.1
4 Robin Hamilton Aeros Combat 13 14:45:00 01:50:27 36.2 795.3
5 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 14:45:00 01:52:52 36.6 776.6
6 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 14:45:00 01:53:26 31.4 763.4
7 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 14:45:00 01:57:24 23.8 732.3
8 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 14:45:00 02:30:05 22.1 577.8
9 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 14:45:00 02:30:39 21.7 573.5
10 Gennadiy Khramov Wills Wing T2C 15:00:00 02:54:01 484.1

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Tue, Sep 21 2021, 9:57:48 am MDT

Day three, task 3

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Live Tracking: https://lt.flymaster.net/bs.php?grp=4085

Replay: https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog__day_3

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Mon, Sep 20 2021, 9:01:49 pm MDT

Day two, task two

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Butch Peachy|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Butch Peachy|Greg Dinauer|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Butch Peachy|Greg Dinauer|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Butch Peachy|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Butch Peachy|competition|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Butch Peachy|competition|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Play Back: https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog__day_2

Open class task:

Not much of a flight:

Johnny Thompson tows me up again right after the Swifts and a couple of early birds at 12:37 PM. The lift is still weak near the hotel so I have to go west to hook up with the Swifts and other pilots and even there it's less than 200 fpm to 5,700' MSL. Lots of thermaling in little more than zero.

At about 7 or 8 minutes before the second clock at 1:45 PM the pilots around me northeast of the hotel head toward the edge of the start cylinder I'm thinking that it's too early and head the other direction to find much better lift than the zero we were giving up on. I climb to 5,800' and then head for the northeast edge of the cylinder.

As I fly to get out of the start cylinder I see a few pilots flying back, some of them quite low, so it looks like they are going back for the third or fourth clock. I keep going and find about eight pilots a thousand feet below me trying to get up three kilometers outside the start cylonder. Now I have a quandary.

I'm high with one other pilot who left the start cylinder with me. My desire is to just forget these guys down low cause I'm positive that there is much better lift just a few kilometers further along. But do I really want to leave eight other thermal finders and go out alone? I spend 10 minutes not climbing circling over these guys who aren't climbing either. Then we find 95 fpm and climb to 4,900'.

Finally, as I watch the pilots from the third clock come in low under us, I've had it and head out leading toward where I had previously thought there was much better lift. The pilots I'm with are not helping at all.

I find 267 fpm near the northeast end of the Casa Grande air field and climb to 5,400'. Of course, the other pilots joined me.

I lead out again and find over 300 fpm to 5,100' just before the first turnpoint at Signal Peak. My hangers ons join me.

I lead out again taking the turnpoint and heading for the foothills to the south. I've got a 6 mph head wind and I go for the hill sides that should gather the thermals. I stop for 100 fpm for one turn but I'm thinking that there is better lift a bit further in. I'm wrong.

Got fooled by the 300+ fpm lift in the previous thermal so I was not ready to take 100 fpm.

It's all sink the rest of the way down the hills to the flats and a premature landing.

Zac took the fourth clock and he was first to goal. Phil Bloom and John Simon who took the third clock came in right behind him. Konstantin Lukyanov from Russia was the last pilot into goal.

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 2

# Name Glider Time
(h:m:s)
Distance
(km)
Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 02:31:02 83.71 988.7
2 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 02:46:53 83.71 930.0
3 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 02:47:39 83.71 917.0
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 03:19:26 83.71 832.3
5 Jeff Chipman Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 80.73 725.7
6 Butch Peachy Moyes RX 3.5/S4 78.36 701.1
7 Ian Brubaker Wills Wing T2C 67.85 632.6
8 Gary Anderson Wills Wing T3 144 58.29 568.6
9 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C 154 58.10 566.6
10 Jason Boehm Wills Wing T3 56.71 561.5

Cumulative:

# Name Glider Total
1 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 1967
2 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 1760
3 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 1697
4 Konstantin Lukyanov Moyes Litespeed RX 1505
5 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C 154 1306
6 Gary Anderson Wills Wing T3 144 1296
7 Greg Dinauer Aeros Combat 12 1231
8 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 1185
9 Jeff Galvin Wills Wing T3 154 1181
10 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 1048

Leonardo Ortiz was the only Sport Class pilot at goal on day one. Leonardo and Tim Delaney were the only two Sport Class pilots at goal on day two.

Chris Zimmerman is out with a blown motor on his Swift, so only two Swifts left. Greg Chastain won day two and is in the lead overall.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Mon, Sep 20 2021, 11:22:32 am MDT

First Task Play Back

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Day One Play Back:

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog__day_1

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sun, Sep 19 2021, 10:57:09 pm MDT

First Task Results

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

competition|John Simon|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/results

Task 1 (open class):

# Name Glider SS Time
(h:m:s)
Lead.
Points
Time
Points
Total
1 Tyler Borradaile Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 14:30:00 01:41:41 87.0 409.6 984.6
2 Zac Majors Wills Wing T3 144 14:30:00 01:41:42 91.7 409.2 977.4
3 John Simon Aeros Combat C 12.7 14:15:00 02:01:06 93.1 281.2 841.0
4 Jeff Galvin Ww T3 154 14:30:00 01:58:41 72.3 294.7 812.6
5 Davis Straub Wills Wing T3 144 14:15:00 02:09:06 102.4 238.4 792.1
6 Willy Dydo Wills Wing T3 136 14:15:00 02:08:29 89.5 241.6 789.4
7 Phill Bloom Moyes RX 3.5 Pro 14:30:00 02:05:30 68.9 257.4 763.7
8 Ian Snowball Moyes RS4.5 14:30:00 02:05:27 39.5 257.6 738.1
9 Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann Wills Wing T2C-154 14:30:00 02:08:34 63.8 241.2 736.2
10 Gary Anderson Wills Wing T3 144 14:30:00 02:08:55 54.1 239.4 723.8

No results for sport class yet.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sun, Sep 19 2021, 10:49:34 pm MDT

Day 1, task 1

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Brian Porter|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Brian Porter|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

Brian Porter|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Brian Porter|John Simon|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

Brian Porter|John Simon|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Robin Hamilton|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|Zac Majors

The task and my flight:

There is a 5 km start cylinder around the launch at the Francisco Grande Hotel airfield (desert). The first leg is about over the Casa Grande airfield to a 2 km cylinder around Signal Peak. Signal Peak is under the 8,000' bottom of the Phoenix Sky Harbor Class B air space, so you don't want to be too high.

The second leg is to the tiny paved airfield at Sarita to the east southeast out in the flats, 400 meter cylinder. Next head north over a bit of no man's land to the intersection at Magma, which is also under the Phoenix airspace. Finally back to a sort of empty field that might have had a dirt air field years ago at Valley.

The forecast was for strong southwest winds aloft which might make getting back to Valley a bit of trouble. Forecast also said no cu's , but there are plenty around. I'm assuming that the heavy rain yesterday softened the lift near the hotel.

Robin Hamilton decides to launch later so I'm first to launch in order but behind two early birds and three Swifts. Two Swift pilots (Brian Porter and Steve Morris) are in France for the new Swift 3 so we don't have out five Swift Pilots. Chris Zimmerman is flying a motorized Swift with a gas motor..

Jonny Thompson tows me up to 2,000' AGL on the four stroke Dragonfly and there is light lift around. I'm able to climb to 4,500' (3,200' AGL) but not more than that. Others seem to be able to get higher but that's as high as I get over the next hour.

Towed up at 1:15 PM, I take the second clock at 2:15 PM at 2300' AGL and head northwest toward the Casa Grande airfield. I'm basically alone.

I quickly find the best lift so far at 270 fpm and climb up to 5,000' MSL. Heading to the cu's to the north of the airfield I find 370 fpm and climb to 7,000'. I'm almost 3 km north of the course line (going for the clouds) and heading for Phoenix airspace.

I nick the turnpoint at Signal Mountain below the airspace and head down south along the foothills toward more cu's. Finally I hit the lift at 1,300' AGL over the hillsides and climb at over 400 fpm to 7,900' (way out from under the airspace) with JD hanging around.

No more mountains to fly as we head off toward Sarita to the east. I'm 2km south of the course line now. There are some cu's out there so it doesn't look so bad, but I'm not expecting at much as I just got at the west facing hill sides with a westerly 5 mph wind..

I take 100 fpm just before Sarita and nick it at 3,300' AGL before heading north toward Magma. There are bigger cu's over Coolidge a little west of the course line, but smaller cu's ahead to the north. I see Zac Majors from the third clock catch up with me as I pass by Coolidge. A few other pilots also. John Simon who started at the second clock also is just a few hundred feet below.

I work 200 fpm east of Coolidge and then head off north to the east of Zac at his elevation at 5,500'. It's a ten kilometer glide before we find 150 fpm with Zac just above me and I'm down to 1,000' AGL.

Zac and Tyler Borradaile work better lift just to my east as I work 150 fpm to 4,700'. I made an attempt to find better lift on the peak just to the northwest given the west wind but that didn't work out as Tyler and Zac found better lift drifting to the east under the same cu that I was under. They just hung there as Zac (at least) knew that they were in first place and didn't need to take any chances or rush out ahead as goal wasn't that far away).

I quit the 150 fpm and headed north seeing that there were cu's and sunlight ahead. Nothing seemed to work whenever I turned in lift so I got to the Magma turnpoint at 2,200' AGL and headed south, with a line of cu's ahead of me.

Finally I hit 260 fpm just south of the cotton fields (I thought that they didn't have any water this year as the Colorado River is so far down and they are the least senior water rights holders) around the turnpoint. That lift got me to 5,200' about 4,000'AGL and with 13 km to goal the race was on.

Arrived with three pilots on the ground. Looks like thirteen pilots made goal.

Results should be out soon. Daniel Velez in Colombia is doing the scoring remotely.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

Sat, Sep 18 2021, 5:44:57 pm MDT

Are the monsoons still here?

Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|photo

Photo by Jamie Shelden

Heavy rains today, the day before the start of the SCFR. Rain in the desert. Will the field be passable?

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

July 25, 2021, 12:07:01 pm MDT

Number of pilots allowed has risen from 24 to 45

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Looks like that means that Bobby's and April's tugs are coming out with Jim Prahl from Wilotree Park.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

July 15, 2021, 5:59:13 pm MDT

Forty one pilots registered and paid

Gregg Ludwig|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Looks like we'll have enough pilots to have the tugs brought out from Wilotree Park. Likely we'll also have Gregg Ludwig and his super trike also.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 25, 2021, 8:57:36 pm MDT

Forty five pilots have registered

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Thirty eight have paid (and I assume committed to coming to the competition). With four more paid (and committed), then the tugs are going to be coming out from Wilotree Park. If all forty five want to come there will need to be an additional tug, which is very possible.

All thirteen of the Sport pilots have paid. Twenty three of the twenty seven registered open class pilots have paid. It sure looks like there will be forty two at least that will pay and commit to coming to the competition.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 22, 2021, 11:16:26 pm MDT

Five Swift pilots have registered

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Two have paid and committed. What's up with the other three?

If they all come I think that that would be the biggest Swift competition in the US ever.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 21, 2021, 8:48:01 pm MDT

42 pilots have registered

Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Now, forty two pilots have registered for the SCFR including four Swift pilots, thirteen sport class pilots and twenty five open class pilots. To bring out two tugs from Wilotree Park, Jamie says that she needs to have forty two pilots registered and paid.

Thirty one pilots have paid. Eleven pilots haven't paid.

Jamie writes:

Entry Fees: The entry fee for the competition is $275 (does not include tow fees) if paid by August 1st. After August 1st, $375. Entry fees are required in full to complete your registration and to secure your entry.

So we'll probably know by August 1st who is committed to coming to the SCFR. You might also want to make your room reservations.

She also writes:

We will initially accept only 24 pilots and they will be accepted in the order of payment of registration fees. If we fill up with 24 paid participants, additional pilots will only be accepted after we have at least 18 more (for a total of 42) confirmed. Once a total of 42 pilots have registered, we can then accept all 42 and confirm the tugs from Florida once all 42 pilots have paid their registration fees.

Personally I think that there is a bit more flexibility and we could do okay with thirty or so pilots and actually with more than forty two, but those arrangements haven't been finalized yet. It depends, again, on how many pilots commit to coming and the tugs from Wilotree Park will definitely not come out unless forty two have committed.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 16, 2021, 8:26:37 MDT

Race to Register and Pay

Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

To secure your slot in the SCFR you need to register and pay Jamie Shelden at <<jamie>>. Just like the race for the first twenty four slots, there is now a race for the next eighteen with two pilots already secured and ten on the waiting list. But being on the waiting list means nothing. Crossing the finish line before others means getting in your payment of $275 before the number of pilots goes to eighteen paid in addition to the twenty four already confirmed.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 15, 2021, 7:08:58 MDT

Francisco Grande reservations

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/blog/accommodation-at-the-francisco-grande-resort

Accommodation at the Francisco Grande Resort

Please make sure to reserve your room at the Francisco Grande as soon as possible. Individual reservations must be made as follows: Individuals must identify themselves as part of Santa Cruz Flats Race, and provide us with guest name, type of room, check-in and check-out dates. Any requests for special arrangements must be made at the time of this call. The Francisco Grande Hotel and Golf Resort toll free reservations line is 1-800-237-4238.

After August 1, the resort releases any unused rooms in our block, so if you wait until after that date, there may not be anything left.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 14, 2021, 4:46:34 pm EDT

24 pilots confirmed, 25 pilots paid.

Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Jamie has written previously:

We will initially accept only 24 pilots and they will be accepted in the order of payment of registration fees. If we fill up with 24 paid participants, additional pilots will only be accepted after we have at least 18 more (for a total of 42) confirmed. Once a total of 42 pilots have registered, we can then accept all 42 and confirm the tugs from Florida once all 42 pilots have paid their registration fees.

I take that to mean that 18 (now 17) additional pilots need to register and pay before Jamie will call for the tugs from Wilotree Park. You pay by sending $275 to <<jamie>> after you register.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 14, 2021, 12:50:02 pm EDT

Register and pay the entry fee ASAP

Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Check and see how many pilots are confirmed. On Monday morning there were 31 registered, but 42 need to be registered and paid to bring the tugs from Florida. Twenty two pilots were confirmed on Monday morning, so two "open" slots left.

See Jamie's requirements re registration and payment here: https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/info/details

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 7, 2021, 8:04:36 pm MDT

Registration to open on Friday

Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/info/details

Jamie says that registration will open on Friday, June 11th at noon Pacific Daylight Time.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 7, 2021, 3:01:59 pm MDT

Register and pay next week

April Mackin|COVID|Jamie Shelden|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021

"Jamie Shelden" <naughtylawyer> writes:

We're really happy to be organizing the Santa Cruz Flats Race again this September after a year off due to COVID. But, I wanted to explain the tug situation so everyone understands how registration and payment will work this year. Thanks to Sonora Wings, we have two dragonflies in Casa Grande. If we have no more than 22-24 pilots, we’ll be covered with these local dragonflies. However, if we have more than 24 pilots register, we will need to bring tugs from out of the area. This is where the issues start. Bob Bailey and April Mackin are able to transport two dragonflies from Florida via trailer. This requires removing the wings and carefully packing them into a trailer and driving them across the country to Casa Grande. Bob and April have done this nearly every year that we have held the event and we are eternally grateful. Here’s the hitch though: the cost of driving the trailer out to Arizona is the same if we put one tug or two tugs in it and that cost is extremely high. What this means is that it is only cost effective to pack up the trailer and bring 2 dragonflies. Bringing just one would make towing very very expensive.

So, we are in a situation where we can have either two or four dragonflies at the Santa Cruz Flats Race, but not three. If we have 42 people register, pay and commit to attend, all is great. But, if we have only 30, the tow fees to each pilot would be prohibitively expensive. With this in mind, it is critical that pilots register, pay registration fees and commit to participate no later than one month before the start of the competition.

When registration opens in about a week, we will initially accept only 24 pilots and they will be accepted in the order of payment of registration fees. If we fill up with 24 paid participants, additional pilots will only be accepted after we have at least 18 more (for a total of 42) confirmed. Once a total of 42 pilots have registered, we can then accept all 42 and confirm the tugs from Florida once all 42 pilots have paid their registration fees.

I realize this is complicated, but we don’t want to wait until the week before the competition starts to determine how much tow fees will be and we don’t want to risk having more than 24, but fewer than 42 pilots because that would make tow fees in excess of $550/person.

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2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race »

June 1, 2021, 10:36:36 MDT

Jamie Shelden is going back to Casa Grande

Jamie Shelden|Risk Retention Group|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2021|USHPA

The competition will be held September 19th through the 25th. The USHPA and the RRRG consider Jamie to be a worthy and reliable meet organizer.

Be prepared for high rental car rates and airlines making up for pandemic era loses.

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A lot of time looking at the ground

Fri, Mar 26 2021, 10:05:26 pm EDT

It looked like we would get high

A lot of time looking

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|PG

The forecast for Friday:

NWS:

Friday

Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. South wind 5 to 10 mph.

Hourly in the afternoon: South southwest surface wind 8 mph, 29% cloud cover.

HRRR 3:

South southwest surface wind at 1 PM: 8 mph, 2000' 11 mph, and 4000' 11 mph

TOL at 1 PM: 5,900'

Updraft Velocity at 1 pm: 580 fpm

CB at 1 PM: 4,900'

B/S at 1 PM: 8.5

At noon:

TOL: 4,100', 420 fpm, CB 4,270' (RAP), B/S 5.6 (so early launch may be possible if the cu's show up, which is likely)

Sea Breeze:

There is a forecasted sea breeze from the west. Surface wind turn more westerly around 4 PM around Brooksville and 5 PM at Groveland. Cu's mostly gone by 5 PM.

Cumulus cloud base will almost be 7,000' at 3 PM.

Task:

Quest 3 km
Kokee 3 km
Baron 3 km
Quest 400 m

82 km

Despite the forecasted 11 mph south southwest winds I figured that with us getting quite high we would be able to overcome them.

The early morning started off with a Zapata, Texas like overrunning with low clouds filling the sky and moving quickly to the north. After a while the clouds separated and there were dozens of cloud streets stretching from south to north as far as we could see to the east and west.

Bunches of pilots were ready to go as we watched the cloud streets disappear later in the morning and just a few cu's appear at noon. Finally a little after one we decided to just get going and hope that the cu's would appear later as they had the previous day.

Larry Bunner was not going first after not hitting any lift on Thursday and I took off after Greg Dinauer at 1:15 PM. Other pilots wanted to see how we did.

Kasey took me to a nearby cu west of Wilotree Park and I climbed to 3,300' but essentially stopped there when the lift went to zero. Heading south with Greg we found lift at 900' AGL at the south end of the field and worked our way back to 3,400' This recovery from 900' was to be a precursor for the day.

Six pilots got together over Groveland and got in each others way as we climbed to 3,600' and then headed west. Apparently pilots had forgotten how to gaggle fly without much practice lately.

There was a dark looking cu south of Mascotte and we all joined up again climbing at almost 240 fpm to 4,200'. This was the strongest lift so far. The cu's were very sparse and there weren't any others nearby that looked this good. I was almost an hour into the flight and had barely gone any where. The wind was cross at 7mph. We were not getting at all high.

We climbed in 144 fpm a few kilometers over the nursery back to 4,000' as the south wind pushed us to the north of highway 50. There were a few cu's off in the distance toward the sawmill.

Heading west we all spread out and separated losing track of each other as we got low by the mine just north of 50. Not finding any lift I was down to 1,400' on the east side of the mine while Larry was further south climbing slowly. None of the pilots I was near was finding anything.

I saw a cu back east toward highway 469 and dove for it. In search mode down to 700' AGL I found lift over a nice open field and a wind that appeared to be out of the southwest at 6 mph.

At this point I figured that my task had changed. My task was now to stay in the air and get up from low. Everything else could wait until later. I was watching the nearby fields very carefully to make sure that I had a safe landing area as it was not at all assured that I would get up.

I climbed to 3,000' and then when the lift gave out headed south southeast toward a huge field that I was familiar with and that had a nice cu over it. 13 fpm got me back to 2,000' and downwind further north and over my next good looking LZ where Mick and I had also previously landed this year (it was a bit down hill).

I flew north back to the next good looking LZ and again at 900' AGL I found lift, this time 240 fpm and climbed to 3,800'. To the north it was mostly swamps and fields that were only accessible by paths so I wanted to stay near my good looking LZ's.

I headed south southeast toward the best looking cu's that I had been watching for a while. It looked like they sort of lined up for a route back toward Wilotree Park. As I was doing all this low work the cu's had started to fill up the sky and they made it much more likely that I would in fact be able to get up, not just stay in the air and perhaps get high enough to make it back to Wilotree Park, my next task.

While I was watching LZ's and staying in the air, other pilots were having trouble landing back near the mine with one pilot suffering leg damage, two broken down tubes and a concussion and another with a sprained ankle. Only Larry, Tiago and I were still in the air, but that would not be for long as there was a fire pumping smoke toward the Kokee turnpoint and cutting off the lift just before the first turnpoint.

I climbed to 4,200' three kilometers north of the chicken coops and headed in the direction of the next cu's but they had moved further east and they were no longer lining up for a good run back to Wilotree Park. Quickly down to 3,100' and what looked like a south southeast head wind, fewer landing options and no cu's where I wanted to head for I turned west and went back to the previously visited huge field that had a nice black cloud on its eastern edge.

I figured that the wind was still southwest on that side of the cu and sure enough by heading north once again on the western edge of the cu I was able to climb at 250 fpm to 4,500'. Now the cu's lined up and I was able to easily follow them back to Wilotree Park. Everyone else was down and some were being rescued while I was all set for tomorrow.

All that took three hours. Sometimes your task is not the one that you started out with, but can be very interesting and challenging none the less. I had turned down the volume on my radio so I had no idea how others were doing as I needed to focus.

https://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/2745314

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Flying Together

March 13, 2021, 7:41:04 EST

Flying Together

Now the radios are working

PG|Wilotree Park

John Simon|PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|PG|Wilotree Park

The winds were still east. Here was the forecast:

NWS:

Friday

Sunny, with a high near 82. Calm wind becoming east around 5 mph in the morning.

Hourly in the afternoon: East surface wind 7 mph, 24% dropping to 6% cloud cover.

HRRR 3:

East slightly northeast surface wind at 1 PM: 5 mph, 2000' 6 mph, 4,000' 6 mph

TOL at 1 PM: 5,900'

Updraft Velocity at 1 PM: 620 fpm

CB at 1 PM: 0'

B/S at 1 PM: 10

Skew-T says maybe cu's.

Seems to me that there would be cu's again like Tuesday-Thursday

Task:

Seems that the winds are still a little too strong for around the Green Swamp so a cross wind task instead.

Quest 3 km
Center 1 km
Baron 4 km
Gators 1 km
Quest 400 m

63 km

We wanted to launch at noon, but there was a little hold up in getting the tugs out to us so I launched second after Larry again at 12:18. The sky had been full of cumulus clouds especially to our south but they were a bit sparse to our north (our task direction) so it wasn't going to be like Thursday where there were dark flat bottomed cu's every where.

The lift was weak under the flimsy cu's after I pinned off at 1,700'. Greg Dinauer was pulled over to me and we worked up to 2,400' with an 11 mph east southeast wind. The first turnpoint was Center Hill to the northwest so we were drifting in the right direction.

We moved over the west by the Mickey Mouse lake as Larry was climbing there and then he came back a bit to join us on the south side of the lake as we all climbed out at 250 fpm to 4,400', It was a great sign that Larry flew back along the course line to hook up with us, an affirmation that we were going to fly together.

We just agreed on each jump direction from cu to cu along the course line down wind toward Center Hill. The cu to choose was obvious and it was easy to stay together and mark the thermals for each other.

Turning to the northeast at Center Hill to head toward the 4 km cylinder around Baron, we headed more east to get to the first cloud. The climb rates were not nearly what they had been the previous day but we were staying high and climbed to 4,400' in this first thermal past Center Hill.

After getting up we headed straight north to the next available cu and climbed to 5,000' drifting in a 10 mph south east wind. The cu's were drying out so we weren't sure whether there would be good markers for lift after the Baron turnpoint.

Arriving at the Baron turnpoint cylinder we climbed in weak lift to 4,600' over an area that was being cleared for more housing for the Villages, right next to the Turnpike, we didn't see many good prospects to the southeast toward Gator field our next turnpoint, so we were in no hurry to leave. The wind had died down to 2 mph out of the north.

The lift was weak out ahead to the south east until we got a few kilometers southwest of the Turnpike and highway 33 intersection where we found 350 fpm to 5,300'. The cu's were gone in front of us but we had a lot more confidence that we would be able to make it around. We could hear the people who launched an hour later working their way toward Center Hill with a lot fewer clouds than we experienced on that part of the task.

I found 170 fpm under a haze dome near the intersection of the Turnpike and highway 27 which got us to 4,800'. Another thermal west of the Amazon distribution center at 270 fpm got us over 5,000'. We were heading into an 8 mph east head wind.

Greg and I lost track of Larry for the first time as he took a course to the south of ours and missed that last thermal. I headed over the warehouses and made the turnpoint at Gator field at 3,800' while Greg stayed back to work lift over the buildings.

I headed southwest down highway 19 toward an area that I pretty much figured would be pumping. They had cleared the land for development and I had climbed out of there last spring. There is a beautiful long east west grass field just to its north so one doesn't have to land in the development (which they usually don't like that much).

I called out to Greg that I was over highway 19 and 8 km from Wilotree Park. Larry was down to 1,600' 3 km to the west over open fields working 100 fpm. I found 220 fpm and just hung out waiting from Greg and for a sure shot to goal no matter what happened in between as there are few landing options.

It was an uneventful glide into goal and landing into a northeast breeze at Wilotree. Greg and Larry were not far behind. We got there before 3 PM. It would be an hour or more before John Simon and then much later Mick Howard would show up. Getting started earlier was a much better idea on a day where the cu's dry out and the lift gets weaker.

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/12.3.2021/17:17

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-open/

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-national:US

https://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/2737009

https://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/league/world/2021/brand:all,cat:2,class:all,xctype:all,club:all

http://wxc.fai.org/module.php?id=22&date=20210313&gliderclass=hg1

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New Wisconsin State Record - 209 Miles »

August 10, 2020, 7:19:49 MDT

New Wisconsin State Record - 209 Miles

Larry makes an ordinary day into an epic flight

Larry Bunner|New Wisconsin State Record|record|Wills Wing

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|New Wisconsin State Record|record|Wills Wing

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|New Wisconsin State Record|record|Wills Wing

Larry Bunner writes:

After an excellent spring here in the midwest, things slowed down a bit of late with soarable conditions but high humidity limiting the climbs and altitudes seen back in May. Our first cold front of the summer passed through on Monday bringing cool dry air to the region. Post frontal air masses mean good conditions and for Tuesday, August 4th XC Skies was predicting 10-15mph north surface winds (20mph at the top of the lift) and fair climb rates up to 6000’msl (mean sea level) cloud base later in the afternoon in Illinois. The Buoyancy Shear (BS) ratio was low as expected due to the stronger winds so the lift would be very turbulent however it would be better further to the south. The Skew T diagram (my favorite weather tool) substantiated the info from XC Skies and showed solid soarable conditions by 11:00. The temperatures at the top of the lift were expected to be in the low 40’s so cold weather clothes would be necessary to keep comfortable.

I spoke with Greg Dinauer in the morning and stated I would get to Whitewater, WI early and be ready to go by 11:00 with the intent to launch once the clouds showed the conditions were solid. Short lived cumulus clouds began forming at 8:30 on my drive to the flight park and slowly began filling the sky as we set up. Chico Sulin volunteered to be our chase driver so we were all set. Greg was towed up at 11:20 to a building cloud street to the northeast and immediately climbed to 4500’msl in 500fpm (feet per minute). I towed up at 11:30 directly to the north. We hit some fair lift and Danny began a broad circle to the west. The winds were already strong and we weren’t very far from takeoff. I feared getting off near the airport in weak lift would put me in a tough position, so I tapped on the line to try to get him to take me further up wind. In my zeal I inadvertently activated my release and separated from the tow plane! Having to land and relaunch entered my mind but the lift was solid as I slowly climbed to 4100’msl (3300’ above the ground) at 133fpm . Greg reported that he landed south of Whitewater Lakes 14 miles to the south. This intensified my focus and I hung on to the next thermal for every bit of altitude exiting at 5000’msl. I thought for sure the day was on however the next few clouds did not deliver and soon I was at 1500’ looking for a suitable landing field. Luckily I latched on to a gnarly bubble that was dumping me on the backside repeatedly as I circled but was slowly gaining altitude. Eventually the lift expanded and there was lift all the way around, taking me to 4200’ (3400’agl). Whew!

XC flying for me is all about maximizing the day. It’s about getting to the site early, getting prepared, assessing the conditions and then launching as soon as is practical. It is critical to be very conservative at the beginning of the day, stay as high as possible and Do Not race. Then during the meat of the day put the hammer down as conditions dictate only to switch gears again late to hang onto any lift regardless of strength. If a pilot can do this and glide from the last cloud to the ground then I would call it an epic flight! This is in contrast to an epic day however. An epic day would be one that has strong lift, high cloud base, early soaring conditions, beautiful cloud streets and strong wind. A day like this leads to big miles.

Switching gears once again after almost decking it, I flew to every little cloud within my downwind periphery and worked them for all they would offer as I passed over the state line into Illinois. The size of the thermals made it difficult to get a complete turn in lift but I had figured out by now that this was how the day was going to be. It was a bit like riding a bucking bronco but thankfully I was flying a Wills Wing TIII Team 144! The handling on the 144 is so easy it feels as if I am on a much smaller glider and even though I was circling in very rough air I was relaxed and confident I could maximize the lift to stay aloft. I kept telling myself to just hang on. With winds aloft at 16-23mph, any lift that kept me climbing was drifting me at a good speed down wind.

Two hours elapsed before I found another good thermal that took me over 5000’msl (4200’agl). I could see better developed clouds to the south and west but just couldn’t quite get to them until I found a solid climb north of Sycamore, IL (about 60 miles from takeoff). From then on I was feeling more comfortable as the clouds were better developed with nice black bottoms and were distinctly lined up in streets (a series of clouds with a very short distance between them). For 40 minutes I stayed relatively high and cruised downwind to Hinckley always scanning for the best clouds and planning my next moves. To the west a robust cloud street formed so I pressed to the SW to connect with this good line. Initially the street didn’t produce the strong lift that the clouds were indicating, I groveled along underneath looking for that monster climb but instead sank like a rock to 2700’ twice before connecting with a stronger core just south of the Fox River near Sheridan that took me back above 5000’.

The thermal drift was now to the southeast and still strong. I was reading wind speeds aloft at ~20mph. Ahead I could see I was on line to fly over the Illinois River and a large cooling lake for the LaSalle Nuclear Plant. From previous experience I knew that large bodies of water can adversely affect the lift down wind so headed further to the southeast to keep me over dry land. Just before the river I connected with a line of clouds and surfed in the lift underneath only turning a couple times when I hit 700fpm. This put me in great position at 5800’ to cross the river and continue down the east side of the lake. Fortunately on this day the water in the lake was considerably warmer than the air due to the warm effluent coming from the nuclear plant so clouds continued to form downwind and the lift remained relatively good.

I have two instruments mounted on my control bar, the Flytec 6030 and Naviter Blade, that provide information that maximizes my ability to soar. They are actually flight computers that provide visual and/or audio cues for altitude, airspeed, climb rate/descent, distance from waypoints, speed to fly, wind speed and more. I have been using the 6030 for over a decade now and am very familiar with the information that it provides. I purchased the Blade a couple years ago as it has a couple of additional features lacking in the 6030; a color map and a thermal assistant. The map provides a high resolution picture of the terrain, roads and towns and more importantly shows controlled airspace in the area that must be navigated around. The thermal assistant gives a pictorial of the strength of the thermals and audio alarms that help the pilot get centered in the stronger lift more quickly. I use both instruments as I am trying to wean myself from the 6030.

After the river crossing, I was heading toward Pontiac, IL a waypoint that was programmed into the instruments that would keep me on a path clear of controlled airspace between Bloomington and Champaign IL. My track to this point was very slightly east of due south. Just north of Pontiac I thermaled up in my best climb to this point at 390fpm to 6100’. Knowing that I would need to navigate around airspace soon, I chose to head SE where the clouds were aligned in that direction. Two thermals later I had the best climb of the day at 449fpm and maxed out at 6309’. I could clearly see Champaign off to the SSE and knew that I’d have to deviate to the east. Fortunately there were good clouds in that direction and I was able to pass just south of Rantoul and skirt around the airspace.

The clouds began to change quickly as the sun descended late in the day. The lift in each thermal became lighter and lighter. I was now hanging on circling and drifting sometimes circling in no lift but knowing I was moving quickly down wind. I had intermittent contact on the radio with Chico and Greg, however they knew my location from the Life 360 app that we all use for tracking. I did hear Greg state that I had just passed over them. I didn’t see my SUV as I was too intent concentrating on the lift and continually scanning for a field to land in. Glancing at my instrument, I was nearing 200 miles. And knew that the current state record (202 miles) was within reach. I just had to hang on. I flew toward one last cloud over a tractor cutting hay and found weak lift. I circled and circled drifting and drifting until there was no more.

In this part of the state there was nothing but corn and soy beans as far as I could see, not another hay field in sight. I maneuvered south to a grass strip of land thinking it was an airstrip but it turned out to be too rutted to safely land in. I now resigned myself to land in the soy beans and after 7 hrs and 4 minutes in the air I unceremoniously landed in 4’ of soy beans 100 yards from the road. I was struggling to lift the glider and slog my way to the road when to my surprise Chico and Greg pulled up and graciously helped extricate me from my predicament. Greg informed me that I set the state record. He was the previous record holder. I was super tired but also super stoked as I finally broke the 200 mile barrier this year after two flights earlier in the year came up just short (190+).

Well, all in all, it wasn’t an epic day as I only topped 5000’ (above the ground) four times and only had three sustained climbs above 300fpm the entire day but it was certainly an epic flight for me as I launched early in questionable soaring conditions and flew to the last cumulus cloud before succumbing to terra firma once again. I am incredibly grateful to enjoy this sport at 66 years of age. Many thanks for the support I get from my wonderful wife Sue, flying friends and Wills Wing. Chico and Greg did an outstanding job keeping up with me and getting me back at a reasonable hour, for this I owe them big time. Thanks all!

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Illinois to Ohio

May 11, 2020, 7:33:04 EDT

Illinois to Ohio

New East Coast hang gliding record.

Blue Sky|Dustin Martin|Greg Dinauer|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Quest Air|record

Krzysztof Grzyb <<doitkg>> writes:

We have had a very cold spring here in the Midwest this year but lately every couple days good flying conditions are showing up.

Last Wednesday top of the lift was up to 10K, thermals around 1000 fpm with 20 mph NW wind encouraged us to fly a challenging 90+ miles triangle from Whitewater WI. Two days later (Friday) the sky was covered with very high Cumulus clouds from Wisconsin to Kentucky with straight north wind. The problem was the forecasted extremely low temperatures (3.0 F) under cloud base so Larry Bunner, Greg Dinauer and I gave up on flying that day.

Instead we focused on Saturday with higher temperature but lower cloud base, weaker thermals with 12-15 mph west wind. Our choice went to Cullom with a static tow system to be able flying cross country straight to the East. Late Friday afternoon we found out that Enjoy Field would start their weekend only aerotowing season. Laura confirmed that a tow plane was ready to tow us.

Our plan was to take off at 11.00 am and get in the air as close together as possible. Larry, John Enrietti (who was driving for us) and I came around 9:00 am to the airport. It was cold, a little above 40° F, and less windy than we expected. Around 10:00 am the first cu showed up 10-15 miles east of us. After setting up our gliders and gear, wearing ski masks, we were ready on the east side E-W runway at 11:00 am and waiting for our tow plane. After 15 minutes I was able to take off first, Larry was second. More pilots were arriving to the airport at this time.

Laura towed me straight into the wind without any turns, exactly what we need from a tow pilot in this windy condition. During tow we hit lift around 200-300 fpm so I stayed in it. Larry took off 15 minutes later. He released very low having some towing issue mixed with low thermal. Finally, he was able survive without landing and climb to be in our game.

We flew straight east with predefined waypoints to avoid airspaces around Kokomo, Fort Wayne, Dayton and Columbus. Sounds optimistic, does it not?

We had a perfectly clear blue sky above our head and we saw also some cu's down wind. The goal was to catch these clouds. It was not easy; these clouds were moving away from us as we flew toward them. To catch them we needed to increase our average speed but in the conditions it was difficult. The air was turbulent (wind) with lot of broken thermal bubbles. In this roller coaster, time to time we were able to find a tight strong thermal up to 500 fpm and climb to 4.5-6K but this was not enough to speed up. I did not have an idea on what strategy I should fly.

I did not want to fall out at noon. Going below 2500 ft in these conditions was very risky. The distance between any active air was long enough to easily make a mistake. I was a little frustrated that in such bright sun I was fighting to survive and flying slow. Larry had the same feelings. We were flying very conservatively.

When we passed I-65 I get low at 1500 ft. Larry was 2-3 miles south of me with better altitude. Luckily I found a bubble which extended later to a strong tight thermal.

From this point (after around 2 hrs from takeoff) we began flying in friendlier conditions with solid thermals up to 8K with 700-800 fpm and cu's closer and closer to us. Average cu life time was not more than 5 minutes, so many times we started turning in the blue sky, but when we reach 7.5-8.0 K cumulus started showing overhead.

Finally, the fun began.

Watching for airspaces we were cruising to the East. We did fly together, but we did not see each other. I was flying on Larry’s south side. A couple miles north of Kokomo a majestic C-17 flew below me not more than 200 ft. I hope the pilots were not texting on their smart phones and that they saw me above their heads.

I had a camelbac but it was useless, the pipe was frozen so no drinking during the whole flight. I had forgotten to push water back from the pipe before takeoff. At top of the lift it was 24-28 F. Only energizer gel was keeping me “alive”. The tail wind at the top of the lift was mostly 20 mph but sometimes more, but at lower altitudes it was slower, so the best thing was to stay high and try not to be frozen.

Passing the Indiana/Ohio border around 200 miles from Enjoy Field Larry suddenly “fell from the sky”. Leaving his last thermal he sank all the way to the ground. Bad luck. John reported that he was on his way to pick him up.

I was still going straight to the east passing Dayton airspace and Columbus air space on North side. Conditions began slowing down, the sun was getting lower. Around 7:00 pm I hit my last thermal which gave me a climb rate of 200-400 fpm. Now, I was afraid of not landing after the sunset, so gliding straight to the ground and not hitting any bumps I landed 5 minutes before sunset 283.8 miles from Enjoy Field in Centerburg, OH.

I was able to break my glider down before dusk, but my remaining gear I packed in flashlight beams. John with Larry came to pick me up 25 minutes later. Now we have 5.5 hr drive to Enjoy Field. I finally got to bed around 4 am.

This flight is my longest cross country flight ever and 0.8 miles longer than the previous US East Coast Record set by Jonny Durand and Dustin Martin from the Quest Air/Sheets Fields in Groveland, Florida almost to South Carolina.

It was great to see again Sandy, Joe, Laura, Danny and John Licada. Huge thanks to John Enrietti for helping us make our dreams come true.

Tired but happy Kris

Flight data:  https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:grzybk/9.5.2020/16:16

455.66 km or 283.134 miles.

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Attempting 100 miles out and return

March 21, 2020, 9:53:11 pm EDT

Attempting 100 miles out and return

A sky full of cu's

PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|PG|Wilotree Park

The soarcast for Saturday

HRRR 3:

1 PM - 5,900' cloud base (54 F)

Updraft velocity - 620 fpm

B/S ratio - 10.0

TOL - 6,600'

Surface winds - W 5 mph

4000' winds - W 3 mph

Cloud cover - 32% going to 23%

Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. Calm wind becoming south southwest around 5 mph.

Launch - 1:00 PM

Task:

Quest - 5 km
Fantasy - 1 km
Clinton - 400 m
Panolk - 3 km
Quest - 400 m

163.3 km = 101.5 miles

HRRR 3 showed a sea breeze coming in at 4 PM

This is the forecast for 5 PM for the Buoyancy/Shear ratio at 5 PM showing the surface winds.

Larry didn't want to risk it going to the west side of the Green Swamp. It turned out that the sea breeze didn't come in if at all until very late, sundown perhaps.

So I set a 100 mile out and return task:

Quest - 5 km
Dallas - 1 km
T33DS - 1 km
Quest - 400 m

161.6 km

I took off first at 12:12 PM and got right to cloud base at 3000'. Greg Dinauer was right with me. We worked together going west to the next cloud and then north to the chicken coops north of Mascotte climbing to cloud base at 3,600'

We had to work weak lift by Grass Roots airfield while Larry was still south of Wilotree Park working to get up. We finally found 300+ fpm to the northwest and climbed to the misty areas at 3,800'. The winds were very light.

Four kilometers to the northwest we found light lift to 3,500' then lost 500' searching for better. The next cu's were 8 kilometers away. I went on glide toward the prisons to the northwest thinking that the day was over for me. At 900' I saw Misael Rosalez turning at about 1,200'. He had been just above Greg and I in the last thermal.

I found the thermal just to the south of Misael and climbed to 4,100' at over 300 fpm. I was just east of the prisons.

I headed north of the Turnpike and found weak lift at 2,900'. Not too many landing areas in this area so I was being careful. I headed for a cloud that got me to possible landing areas. Before I got to it I found 260 fpm from 1,900' to 3,500'.

I was just west of the Villages with plenty of open fields. I headed north to the next cu's and found 260 fpm to 4,800'. Another thermal to 4,800' and then it was a glide to the grass airfield at Dallas. just northwest of the Villages. The wind was out of the south at 7 mph.

I made the turnpoint at 3,100'. There was a huge cu right there a little to the west. I worked weak lift just to the south of the turnpoint then went further south toward forming cu's. Larry came into the turnpoint at 4,000' and soon Greg made the turnpoint a bit lower than I.

I found 300 fpm and climbed to 4,600' with Greg coming in with me. Larry went further south but then landed.

Going further south the lift improved and we found 400 fpm to 5,700' right over the middle of the Villages. We were right above Larry.

After climbing in the next thermal to 5,200' I headed south toward the Turnpike. Greg was behind and lower. There were lots of cu's ahead by the Turnpike.

Greg and I worked the first lift just north of the construction area north of the Turnpike. But we could only get 90 fpm to 3,000'. There were plenty of big cu's just to the south of the Turnpike. We finally went for them.

Down to 2,100' We found 60 fpm and worked it for twenty minutes drifting to the east slowly to 3,200'. Greg was just below me and we were both just hanging on. We were over a shadow and under a big dark cu.

Finally I headed west and Greg southwest to get on the sunny side of the cu. We just lost lift going down at 500 fpm. Greg was very low. I was at 2,600'.

I headed south as Greg south of me headed east along the county road. At 700' AGL just as he was about to land he found 500 fpm. I came over to him at 1,300', he at 1,200'. The lift went away. The wind was only 3 mph out of the southwest.

We landed together next to the road.

You can find Larry and my flights here:

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-national:US

https://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/league/world/2020/brand:all,cat:2,class:all,xctype:all,club:all

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Comparing the Naviter Blade to the Volirium P1

March 20, 2020, 9:54:51 pm EDT

Comparing the Naviter Blade to the Volirium P1

The vario sounds

John Simon

Greg Dinauer|John Simon

Greg Dinauer|John Simon

Much of this winter I have been flying with the Flytec 6030 and the Volirium P1. I very much like the P1's vario tones compared to the 6030. I like the 6030 for navigation, speed to fly and for final glide calculations.

https://flytec.com/6030.html

https://flytec.com/voliriump1.html

Recently I started flying with just the Naviter Blade. Other pilots (Larry Bunner, John Simon, and Greg Dinauer) who fly with me have also been using the Blade, most often with other flight instruments. John and Greg raised issues with the Blade's vario tones starting and stopping too abruptly. I hadn't really noticed this.

https://flytec.com/blade.html

I flew with it with this criticism in mind and saw that the tones were in sync (so to speak) with the vario display. No sounds when the displayed showed zero or less lift. I have the vario sounds set to sound when I was a 20 fpm climb rate.

I then flew with the Blade and the P1 together. The Blade on the left and the P1 on the right. I turned down the volume on the Blade (it is quite loud at 100%) to 80% so that I could turn both instruments without the Blade dominating.

They sounded almost exactly the same. The sound cut off and came back on at the same time with each instrument. I liked the sound of the Blade the first time I flew it and it was because it sounded just like the P1.

I also have the original XC Tracer. I like its sounds also. I'll fly with it and the Blade and see if they are in sync.

https://www.xctracer.com/en/76/?oid=1905&lang=en

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So let's do a hard task

March 19, 2020, 9:10:59 EDT

So let's do a hard task

Out and return into the wind.

Wilotree Park

John Simon|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Wilotree Park

The soarcast for Wednesday:

HRRR 3:

1 PM - 6,200' cloud base (50 F)

Updraft velocity - 660 fpm

B/S ratio - 9.7

TOL - 6,900'

Surface winds - ESE 8 mph

4000' winds - ESE 13 mph

Cloud cover - 14% - NWS, 0% - HRRR 3

Sunny, with a high near 88. Light east wind becoming east southeast 5 to 10 mph in the morning.

The original task was to the north west, but given the fact that we didn't want to fill a car with retrieved hang glider pilots in this age of social distancing, we decided on an out and return task against the substantial winds. Just 42 kilometers to the Turnpike and back.

I was off first and found almost 200 fpm pretty quickly from 1,500'. The wind was 10 mph out of the east southeast. After getting up I headed south southeast to a better cu and climbed from 1,800' to cloud base 4,400' at 200 fpm. Larry was working 150 fpm north of Wilotree Park. Greg Dinauer volunteered to drive. John Simon hadn't launched yet (he is always last).

I got under an east southeast/west northwest cloud street at Mascotte and waited for Larry. Then headed upwind under the cloud street to where he was circling. My radio flipped its channel, so I soon had to just use visual clues to find other pilots.

We headed north to a nice looking cloud while there seemed to be a blue hole in the direction of the turnpoint to the north northwest. We climbed at a little less than 200 fpm to over 4,000' drifting to the northwest.

The cu's to our north didn't work out so I headed to a good looking cu to the northeast. The lift was weak as Larry, Maria and I worked it. Then I spotted a bird to our north northwest twirling up very rapidly. I went right to that spot and found 250 fpm. Larry and Maria joined me.

We climbed and drifted and eventually got to 5,000'. We went to the north northeast to get under a cloud street that stretched toward the turnpoint at the Turnpike and highway 33 and then east southeast paralleling the Turnpike. There was only a bit of lift there.

Larry then I took the turnpoint and headed back upwind (which was now 13 mph). John, Jim and Maria were with us but lower. Larry got high quicker and headed south southeast. I decided to ride the cloud street to the east southeast.

I couldn't get back to 5,000' but stayed above 4,000 for half the ride. I kept going from cloud to cloud, but the lift was weak if there at all. I just wasn't going down particularly fast and I was going straight into the wind trying to get a bit upwind of Wilotree Park.

Down to 3,100' almost to the intersection of highways 19 and 27 and with few landing areas in that direction, I headed south toward the next cloud street (you know its direction by now). It was 5 kilometers away.

There were some landable fields ahead just north of the gigantic tree farm. I was more concerned about making them than actually getting to the cloud street.

I came over the area that they were clearing to plant more trees at 700' AGL. The field that I planned on landing in was just to the north, but I had enough altitude to check out this recently cleared land that still had equipment operating in it.

At the upwind end of the field I found a little bit of lift and starting turning. The lift was weak at first and I was drifting quickly back toward lakes and trees. I didn't want to leave this landable field or the ones to the north. I was climbing at about 130 fpm.

I'm hanging on for dear life as I drift toward the trees and the lakes. I find 500 to 600 fpm and climb to 2,000' but lose the lift. I'm near a nice looking cu and I can see right up the cloud street to the east southeast. I push upwind to get to the upwind edge of the cu still over the same field and find strong lift, averaging 365 fpm to 4,800'.

This gives me plenty of altitude to make goal with a 6:1 glide ratio required. There are few landable areas going south toward Wilotree Park from my spot over highway 19, so I don't leave until I'm certain that I can get in.

I'm able to find an area of sink south of the flight park and this time I'm able to get down.

No one else has made the task yet. Larry landed out by Mascotte trying to get to goal against the head wind. I guess it was a pretty good idea to head upwind after all, even though it was a huge amount of luck that I was able to get back up. Much later Jim, John and Maria made it back in.

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Half Way Around the Green Swamp

March 12, 2020, 7:17:58 EDT

Half Way Around the Green Swamp

The forecast was for big areas of no lift

sailplane

John Simon|sailplane

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|sailplane

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|sailplane

Finally with light winds, cu's and a high forecasted cloud base we headed for our favorite task, around the Green Swamp (over lots and lots of trees).

Greg Dinauer was up first and I got pulled up at about 12:45 (11:45 sun time). It was easy to get off at 1,500' when you're in 900 fpm (while on tow). Just kept going up at 250 fpm to 3,600' right below Greg.

Heading south following Greg I thought for a few minutes that I might have screwed up not heading a bit more easterly and I finally did head east to find a thermal at 1,500' which produced an average of 180 fpm over a very wide range  to 4,000' with a light southeast wind.

That very nice altitude let me work a little light lift north of the Seminole Glider Port which looked like it was having the masters competition and then head to south of the glider port again down to 1,500' but with the reassurance from Greg that there was lift down there.

I found 300 fpm and after a short while three sailplanes joined me in the thermal. It is amazingly easy to out climb them or just stay above them. I hear that pisses them off.

Leaving at 4,400' I knew I was plenty high enough to head out over the actual swamp after avoiding it on the way south. Greg was ahead and Larry who launched after us and after breaking one of the 140 pound weak links was nearby. Now the task was to stay out of the clouds with over 300 fpm showing up under them.

The sky was full of big dark clouds with lots of vertical development, although not enough to cause serious issues. I was climbing to over 4,000' all throughout the area where there are little to no landing areas and it really wasn't causing any distress as your good fortune was clearly visible ahead of you.

Seven kilometers out from the one kilometer radius turnpoint at the intersection of the north south highway that goes through the Green Swamp and highway 98 I was at 4,700'. By the time I got to the turnpoint I was down to 2,800' and there were shadows from all those clouds almost every where.

I came in with Greg but wasn't finding much and losing altitude quickly. Heading off to the only spot of sunlight off to the southwest a couple of kilometers and down to 1,800' I found lift that averaged almost 500 fpm to 4,800' in a 7 mph east wind. Greg and Larry joined me.

There was a northwest/southeast cloud street off to our northwest and Greg and I went for it as Larry took a more northerly tack along the course line. We found good lift under the street but it was going the wrong direction. We were at 4,800' while Larry was at 2,000' to our east.

With a big blue hole to our north I headed for the cu's near Dade City off to the north northwest. Unfortunately it was futile as I couldn't glide that far even with a 5 mph tail wind. I ended up landing in a big field that was downhill back into the indicated wind. I was able to drag my feet through the grass before I hit the last drop off to the trees and land gracefully.

Larry and Greg landed just after me straight to my east in nice flat fields. John Simon landed about the same time but further back as he took off last.

Until we hit the no lift zone the day was fantastic. Looks like it will be a good day on Thursday also.

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Winter Flying at Wilotree Park

February 18, 2020, 9:13:29 pm EST

Winter Flying at Wilotree Park

It's been light lift the past three days

Larry Bunner|Wilotree Park

John Simon|Larry Bunner|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Wilotree Park

Larry Bunner, John Simon, Greg Dinauer and I have been flying the past three days. Sunday and President's Day my flights were a little shorter than I would have liked. Others did well, but no one was able to complete the triangle tasks given the light lift.

Today was no exemption, but perhaps better lift.

Conditions started weak and after a while Greg decided to stay local. The wind was out of the south at about 13 mph.

Launching at 1:20 PM (second launch) I worked 100 fpm or less following Larry who had launched earlier to the north northwest and not getting above 2,800'. There were plenty of cu's around but they were misty and not well formed. No black bottoms.

I lost contact with Larry north of Mascotte, but saw that John was nearby. We flew together and found 200 fpm west of Grass Roots airfield to 3,400', then turned west to head toward the first turnpoint at Cheryl, a north/south grass air strip.

We worked a couple of less than 200 fpm thermals south and west of Center Hill until we found lift that on the 30 second averager showed 480 fpm (but overall was 260 fpm) on the southwest corner of the forested area three kilometers from Cheryl. That got us back to 3,400'.

Larry joined up with us there although he had been ahead and then got the turnpoint after us.

The next turnpoint was the Baron airstrip on the northeast. John caught a better climb and got to 4,000' on the west side of the forest. Larry came in under me and I climbed to 3,700' before heading after John toward the prison complex.

There were plenty of cu's ahead and John got halfway through the forest and then called out that he was heading toward the cu's to the northeast. I got there and decided to head to the cu to the east instead. I noticed that there was a fire feeding it.

I got there and found 600 fpm (it averaged 370 fpm) to 4,200'. John came back under me to join in the better lift and Larry came in low (but didn't go far enough south toward the fires). Larry would land at the Turnpike.

I headed out in front for Baron with John coming soon behind me. I was down to 2,600' in the 3 kilometer turnpoint cylinder when John called out 300 fpm 2 kilometers behind me. I came in under him but it averaged 45 fpm for me.

John topped out at 4,100', made the turnpoint at Baron and headed north up along the east side of the Villages. I left at 2,500' and headed west along the north edge of the Turnpike over areas being graded for development and toward a large black bottom cloud over a lake and swamp area.

I was only going down at 200 fpm and there were some possible landing areas ahead along the Turnpike. I wanted to get south of the big cumulus cloud. I finally did find the source of its lift at 1,700' and started climbing at 300 fpm in a very smooth and very tight thermal. The air was rising throughout each rotation.

I took it to 4,100' and headed north northwest slightly to get around the blue hole to the north and toward the better looking cu's. I wasn't getting anything and northwest of Wildwood I heard from John that he had laded. He didn't get anything after Baron.

I kept heading toward the thickness looking cu's but I didn't find a thing. I came over a really big field next to a paved road at 1,300' and then searched around to see if there was any lift in the vicinity. Not finding anything worth hanging out in I landed in my preferred field. Logan, our driver, was there with John as I finished breaking down. 52 minutes back to Wilotree Park.

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Flying in Florida in the Middle of December

December 17, 2019, 8:21:41 EST

Flying in Florida in the Middle of December

Up to the north with a south southeast breeze

Greg Dinauer|John Simon

John Simon and Greg Dinauer went for it in light conditions with a 5 - 10 mph south southeast winds on December 16th.

XCSkies HRRR- 3km model forecasted a 7 mph surface tail wind (10 mph at 2000') and lift conditions at 400 - 500 fpm (climb rates of 200 - 300 fpm, with cloud base at 3,000' - 4,000' at 2 PM. The forecasted cloud base (cumulus clouds) would rise to 4.000' to 5,000' by 4 PM (sunset was 5:30 PM).

John and Greg were flying in a sky full of cu's that guided them from Wilotree Park to the Leeward private air field (not landing at the field itself), 40 miles. They followed the clouds on the east side of highway 301 west of the Villages. They were quite a bit west of the direct line show below (we always go west of that line to stay out of Leesburg airspace).

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Good Times at ⁢Wilotree Park »

Mon, Dec 16 2019, 7:54:04 am EST

Is it winter yet?

Wilotree Park

John Simon|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Wilotree Park

Photo by Connie Bailet.

Two of the seven Sandhill Cranes that hung around on Sunday.

Six tandems and lots of other flights today, a day with a high of 75 degrees. Tomorrow looks like it may reach 82 degrees, 83 on Tuesday is the forecast. A bit cooler later in the week. Monday looks like a cross country day with southeast winds 5 to 10 mph. John Simon and Greg Dinauer, at least, are going. Maybe I'll join them.

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Please support the Oz Report

March 29, 2019, 7:55:26 EDT

Please support the Oz Report

It's time for all you procrastinators to step up

Davis Straub|Dennis Yeomans|George Stebbins|Mark Dowsett|Oz Report|Wilotree Park

Davis Straub|Dennis Yeomans|George Stebbins|Greg Dinauer|Mark Dowsett|Oz Report|Wilotree Park

Davis Straub|Dennis Yeomans|George Stebbins|Greg Dinauer|Mark Dowsett|Oz Report|Wilotree Park

Thanks for the very generous support from Gary McIntire and also from Dennis Yeomans, Steven Rewolinski (Revo), Greg Dinauer, Mark Dowsett, George Stebbins, and Doug Litzenberger.

I've had it with this fund raiser. That's it. It's almost over. This issue goes out in the Monday morning mail and that officially ends the March, 2019 Oz Report fund raiser. We've had our little fun, but it's ending with a bang or a whimper. Either way it's ending. Every year we have a few readers who can sit through all this begging and still wait to the very end to cough up some dough. What fortitude.

So to continue...

This is the month where I ask Oz Report readers for their support.  Your contribution pays for hosting our web site and for Gerry's technical support to keep it running.

Here are our supporters: http://ozreport.com/supporters.php

As you know, all we are asking for is a subscription payment of $20/year.

Seems simple enough. Like most content on the internet, you get to read the Oz Report for free. The trouble for us, not you, is that there are not enough hang glider pilots in this world to make advertising pay for our web hosting costs.

Please, help us out. Support something that you find useful so that it can continue to be there for you.

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If you can contribute from your PayPal Balance or from your bank account that is connected to your PayPal account, please do, as this incurs no PayPal fee.

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Type in my email address which you can discern from "davis" and I'm at "davisstraub.com." (I have to write it this way as we hide email addresses here at the Oz Report.

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4) If you’d rather just send a check for $20 or more (US Dollars only, please), please feel free to do so.

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If you send a physical check, be sure to send me your email address so that I can register you as a subscriber.

These are our supporters (if you are not on the list and have donated to the Oz Report, email me and I'll make sure that you are recognized): http://ozreport.com/supporters.php. Some of you who I've missed in the past did write to me and made sure I knew just how important the Oz Report was to them. If I've missed you, please do tell me.

5) Another option. Come over to the Oz Report support web page and sign up to support us: http://ozreport.com/support.php. Or click here:

Thanks to all our supporters  http://ozreport.com/supporters.php who have kept us going and paying our bills over the last twenty three years.

6) If you use the "Cash" App, send to .

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8) Come on over to the Oz Report World Headquarters situated at Wilotree Park, identify yourself, and "show me the money." We're in the brown Spartan 5th wheel facing the lake.

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We honor the Green pre-Saint Paddy's Day

March 15, 2019, 10:06:34 pm EDT

We honor the Green pre-Saint Paddy's Day

By flying around the GREEN Swamp

Larry Bunner|PG|sailplane|weather|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|PG|sailplane|weather|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|PG|sailplane|weather|Wilotree Park

http://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/2217308

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/15.3.2019/17:16

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-national:US

Mick Howard, Greg Dinauer, and I decided to fly around the Green Swamp, 103 km, given the forecast for lighter winds out of the southwest. Larry Bunner had to be back early for a dinner engagement so he would only fly with us to the first two turnpoints.

This was the morning forecast:

https://ozreport.com/seweather.php

Mostly sunny, with a high near 86. Calm wind becoming south southeast around 5 mph in the morning.
Surface winds 7 - 6 mph, south southeast going slowly to southwest

HRRR 3, 1 PM:

Updraft velocity: 660 fpm
TOL: 5,600’
Wind TOUL: 3 mph, southwest
B/S: 10

The forecasts for the winds at TOL have been reduced substantially compared with last night. While the winds are still west or southwest they are in the 4 to 7 mph range to our west. So, a closed task around the Green Swamp could be possible. There will be cu’s.

Larry launched first given his pressing dinner engagement, got towed to 3,000' and headed out on his own. Mick, I, and Greg were next a little after 1 PM and we all got together and headed south. There were sailplanes every where as they are having their competition just to our south so we got to use them as thermal markers.

I was leading out and had to dig out from 1,500' on the third thermal as Greg and Mick joined me. Then we saw the sailplanes as we got up and two thermals later we took 500 fpm to 4,900' in a gaggle with five sailplanes. This was high enough to send us over to the southern section of the Green Swamp where there were plenty of cu's and a few sailplanes to keep us high.

The lift was broken with no solid identifiable cores that lasted for the entire climbs. The lift would average over 200 fpm, but vary between 400 and 100 fpm  as you circled around. The wind was 2 - 4 mph out of the southwest. Mick and I had dropped Greg after getting the 3 km turnpoint just south of a sailplane port. We joined up with Larry who was heading back from the second turnpoint.

After climbing at 450 fpm to 4,900' 7 km from the second turnpoint at the intersection of highway 98 and 471 I went on glide to the next cu's just on the east side of the turnpoint. 1 km before I got to the turnpoint I found 150 fpm, weak lift and broken and climbed back from 2,600' to 2,900'.

I made the mistake of leaving this lift (wasn't it just 450 fpm) and heading for good looking cu's next to the turnpoint. I was so close. But they weren't working for me.

Down to 1,100' AGL I was checking out landing options west of the turnpoint while hanging out over a swamp in zero sink. I heard from Mick that he was climbing at 100 fpm, but I could not get him to describe what the land looked like below him. Finally I spotted him above to my north over the obvious white (sandy) field and came in under him at 900' AGL. The lift was indeed there and all three of us joined up with me on the bottom and climbed out, them much higher as I left at 3,900' and they were well over 4,000'.

Heading northwest across the swamp I stopped for 100 fpm when they were well ahead of me. Mick came back after not finding any thing. Greg struggled out to our west.

The lift was ridiculously broken and weak but we had to get up in something. It was already almost 4 PM and we were concerned about the day shutting down early as shown in the forecast.

I headed north and found 300 fpm to 4,500' and lost Mick in the process. Greg was northwest of us and climbing east of Dade City. I headed for him and found lift at 1,500' AGL as he circled at 4,200'. 113 fpm, broken and just a pain to fly in, but again I had to stay up and started pretty low. The wind was 8 mph out of the south southwest and I drifted three kilometers getting back to 3,300'.

Greg was near the turnpoint at Ridge Manor when his Flytec 6030 stopped working. He now had to rely on his backup, XCSoar on his phone. 8 km south of this turnpoint I found 300 fpm and climbed to 5,200'. Mick came in underneath me as I was climbing up and reporting my location and climb rate.

This was a big flat bottom cu, the first that we had seen all day. The lift was actually pleasant to climb in. There were more of these ahead as the day got later and things mellowed out a bit.

I headed for the similar looking cu north of the turnpoint but only found 100 fpm lift. But, I was patient because I had to be. There was a big chunk of swamp land to the east that I had to cross. There were other cu's a little off to the east that promised a bit of lift. The wind was now 5 mph out of the west southwest. Mick had again come in under me at the cu north of the turnpoint.

We headed east and I found a little over 200 fpm just southwest of the lumber yard, our last 3km turnpoint. That got me from 3,000' to 4,800' and the 6030 was saying I just would make it into goal. The tail wind helped a lot. Mick was just 500' or so below.

With goal at Wilotree Park just a 11:1 glide away I went on glide with the altitude at goal predicted to be over 1,000'.  I headed for the cu's on the course line but I wasn't finding anything. The 6030 was still showing me making goal but there was a 2.5 km wide swamp just before the goal field that I didn't really want to go over low.

Down to 1,100' under a good looking cu and over a nice big landing field I found nothing. I decided that I could go a little further east and land at Osborn airfield just on the west side of the swamp if I needed to.

Down to 900' AGL and before I got to Osborn I found 140 fpm lift. I was able to climb to 1,700' AGL drifting toward Wilotree and came in with plenty of extra altitude as I got a 14:1 glide over the little swamp.

Mick came in just behind me. Greg had already made it in using his phone as his vario. It is always nice to have a backup.

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Larry Bunner is today's hero

March 14, 2019, 9:31:51 pm EDT

Larry Bunner is today's hero

He was past Williston the last time we looked on Live 360.

Larry Bunner|record|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|record|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|record|Wilotree Park

He was followed by Mick Howard and Cory Barnwell.

https://airtribune.com/play/3935/2d

It shows me, Cory and Mick. I dropped out early along with Greg Dinauer. Cory made it well past Williston on his U2- 145. Mick's track log doesn't show him past the turnpoint at Dunellon, but we saw him heading for Gainesville (not a good idea) earlier on Live360. Larry didn't check in to the Wilotree Park Cross Country, but it looks like he could have made it to the new goal at the small private airfield south of Lake City, 186 km.

The day started with a strong east wind. Leesburg airfield to our north recorded southeast 14 mph gusting to 24 mph at 11 AM, and 15 mph east at 10 AM. We wanted to wait until the wind turned southeast as forecasted and calmed down to less than 10 mph.

The sky at noon was full of cu's, too full. The earth wasn't getting much heating from the 90% cloud cover. We waited until a little after 1 PM as the sky gradually cleared a bit and the winds become more south east and calmed down a bit. I launched first at 1:20 followed by Larry, Mick, and Greg.

The lift was very weak at first and I lost 500' down to 1,900'. Then I drifted to the north, down wind, and found 250+ fpm on average to 4,100' Larry joined in with me.

There were plenty of cu's, but not particularly thick or black bottomed, so we headed northwest. More weak lift and then we found 300 fpm northwest of the chicken coops back to over 4,000'.

Again we found weak lift and I left it at 3,500' heading toward the prisons. There were plenty of cu's ahead so it seemed safe, but it wasn't I maintained at 1,400' but that lasted not much more than 5 minutes before I lost the zero sink and landed. Larry had gone further west toward Center Hill and found enough to stay up and then get up. Mick was catching up. Greg soon went down just a few kilometers to the north west of me south of the prisons.

We'll know tomorrow just how well Larry did and whether Mick was able to get to the west and not land in Payne's Prairie south of Gainesville.

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On day five the cu's finally come

Fri, Feb 8 2019, 10:40:26 pm EST

Friday ends our work week of soaring conditions

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Wallaby Ranch

I take the day off to work on my RV roof, while Mitch Shipley, Rob Clarkson, Greg Dinauer, Larry Bunner and numerous others take to the skies that are filled with cu's for the first time all week. Larry says that he left low going downwind to the south and didn't get above 2,800' until he was past the Seminole Glider Port. He was able to make it back after getting the first turnpoint at Dean Still and highway 33.

The cu's disappear early and Mitch was not able to make it back with a triangle task that included a turnpoint at Wallaby Ranch. The weekend looks windy and maybe a bit of rain.

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On the fourth day we did our task

February 8, 2019, 7:16:57 EST

On the fourth day we did our task

Grass Root and Center Hill

Larry Bunner|PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|PG|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|PG|Wilotree Park

http://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/2191667

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/7.2.2019/18:52

The secondary task, if the conditions weren't that great, was to go from Wilotree Park north up highway 33 to Grass Roots airfield, turn west toward Center Hill. There was a 1 km turnpoint cylinder around Center Hill, then back to Wilotree.

I came in under Larry Bunner at the Mickey Mouse shaped lake just northwest of Wilotree Park and slowly climbed up to join him. I climbed at an average of 200 fpm to 3,800' as we drifted to the northwest at 11 mph. I didn't see Rob Clarkson or Greg Dinauer. And the radio channel wasn't working likely from Larry's broken PTT button.

Larry signaled for us to leave together and we headed north toward Grass Roots. The twelve kilometer glide with no lift got us down to 700' AGL before we found lift north of Grass Roots. I was headed a bit to the west going under Larry to get over a preferable landing field (the one we were over had a bunch of cows in it), and found the lift with Larry right behind me. We climbed, but slowly, and only to 2,600'. This made the decision to head toward Center Hill instead of the primary task turnpoint at the overpass at the Turnpike and highway 33 fairly straight forward. Of course, after that everything got much better.

We climbed to 4,000' in the next thermal just before Center Hill. Larry was in the lead and took us low over a small community where he found the lift at 900' AGL. I was wondering if he had a landing option.

The wind had died to 4 mph out of the south east. We quickly got the turnpoint and headed east southeast. We both found lift separately over a field that I've been over many times and appreciate for its consistent lift.

Joining up we climbed to 4,000' and headed south east toward the chicken coops at Mascotte, another known thermal hotspot. We didn't get low before climbing again to 4,000' a third of the way to the coops. I lost Larry as I headed a little more south then he did, but apparently my line was much better than his as he watched me continually glide higher and higher than he did.

I found 200 fpm a kilometer before the chicken coops again to 4,000' and then as I came over them saw Larry just to their south climbing far below. A couple of turns over him and then on glide to goal. There was plenty of lift along the way. We came in together.

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AltAir, Android-based flight instrument and software »

July 23, 2018, 7:48:16 MDT

AltAir, Android-based flight instrument and software

Extreme flexibility in user-defined screens

AltAir|Facebook|Greg Dinauer|Oleg Bondarchuk|video

Let's go back and look at some of the previous Oz Report articles about the AltAir flight instrument/vario/pod.

http://ozreport.com/21.28#0

http://ozreport.com/21.097#0

Home for the software, by Evgen Lysenko: http://altair.no-ip.org/index.html

Pod and flight instrument: https://www.facebook.com/altairvario/

This is the AltAir software running on the AltAir hardware that is inside the pods from Oleg Matvieiev:

I have a pod from Oleg. It includes a battery for charging the phone in flight, but does not include the AltAir vario/flight computer or pitot tube as I have an external vario (XCTracer) that I would like to hook up to the AltAir software.

I have created three screens for my AltAir configuration. I'll no doubt change them as I get used to the device.

Each of the fields displayed on the screens below, referred to as widgets by the software, can be moved, resized, color changed, text border color changed, a box around the widget added (it is the default),  the title size changed, you can choose whether there is a title or not, the level of transparency changed, deleted, and a lot more. There are over 70 widgets to choose from.

The widget sizing is very incremental with snap to a fine grained visible grid.

Some widgets are action oriented. You touch them and an action takes place, for example, switching to the next screen or zooming in on the map.

The inside the Start Cylinder screen:

Most of the top half of each of the three screens starting with the value for my current "Direction" of travel field and going up the right side are exactly the same. The values displayed in the fields are as follows from the top right hand side on down:

Barometric/pressure "Altitude, ft" set equal to GPS altitude at launch.

Wind speed, "Wind Spd, mph" and wind direction arrow overlaying each other.

Direction arrow to the "Next Waypoint," with the name of the waypoint right below the direction arrow.

Distance to the next waypoint, "Dist WP, km".

On the left hand side of the upper half of the screen I have:

"Next Screen," which means tap here to switch to the next screen.

"+" and "-" i.e., zoom in on the map and zoom out.

The "Vertical Speed, fpm," which is the 20 second average of my climb rate.

Below the averaged "Vertical Speed,fpm" but not visible, are my analog varios showing graphically my instantaneous and averaged rate of climb (or sink). These two elements are also displayed on the next screen, the one used for flying on the course line. They are not displayed on the third screen, the final glide screen.

The bottom half of this screen is dedicated to information useful when waiting in the start cylinder for the task to start.

Right below the  "Direction" widget is the current time.

My current total air speed, "TAS" and ground speed, "Speed."

The ground speed that I need to fly at to get to the edge of the start cylinder in time for the window to just open, "Speed Start Cyl, mph."

How much time is left before the start gate opens, "time st cyl."

The distance to the edge of the start cylinder, "Dist Cyl, km."

The task screen for thermaling and gliding around the course:

This is the same as the start screen, but without the two fields that were only needed for the start. I have the distance to the waypoint and the distance to the waypoint cylinder.

The map will show the task and my position along the task. I can zoom in and out and see more closely whether I'm about to tag the next turnpoint.

The final glide screen:

The key fields for final glide are the bottom five.

"Altitude at Goal, ft" displays the altitude that I will arrive at goal at given your current speed under the standard assumptions about what lies ahead of me with respect to lift, sink and wind.

"Alt BG Goal, ft" displays my altitude above the best glide line to goal, or equivalently the altitude I will arrive at goal at if I fly at my best glide speed, i.e. my Speed-To-Fly assuming a McCready value of 0 fpm.

"Dist Goal, km" is pretty obvious.

L/D ground is my current glide ratio over the ground (not just relative to the air).

L/D goal is my required L/D over the ground in order to make goal.

As you can see these variables are similar to the ones displayed on the Flytec 6030. All the discussion that I presented in the previous article about the Flytec 6030 applies to these variables, http://ozreport.com/22.137#0.

I have not used the AltAir hardware vario. Greg Dinauer found that the volume setting was too low on the original hardware. They are replacing that for him. Here is his comparison with the Flytec 6030: http://ozreport.com/pub/images/altairgreg.mp4.

I originally tried out the AltAir software on my Samsung Galaxy S4. I couldn't see the screen in bright sunlight, like we have in Florida, Texas, and Arizona. I will check it out on a Samsung Galaxy S6. Oleg states that it is visible on phones with phones with amoled screens or IPS screens with OGS (one glass screen) technology. He says that some pilots are experimenting with white digits on black backgrounds.

As you can see from my screens, the AltAir software can configured to be very much like the Flytec 6030. Since many pilots use this hardware it is a great idea to build in the same functionality into your software. This makes the transition a lot easier. Missing, but coming in the future are: wind component and Speed-to-Fly speed widgets.

My configuration is found in this file which you can import into AltAir (after you export your existing one): http://ozreport.com/data/davisstraub_settings.xml. This includes all the screen/page configurations. If you just want to copy the screen configurations over existing or onto new pages you can find them here: http://ozreport.com/data/start2.cfg, http://ozreport.com/data/thermal2.cfg, and http://ozreport.com/data/final2.cfg.

I have since copied the USA OpenAir-formatted airspace into the AltAir airspace folder. It works perfectly. You'll find it here: http://www.maddyhome.com/hangglide/airspace.html.

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The small Aeros Combat

July 4, 2018, 1:50:07 pm MDT

The small Aeros Combat

Full carbon

Greg Dinauer

Ready for testing:

The small full carbon Aeros Combat

Greg Dinauer is very excited about this development which he has been waiting five years for.

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Refugio day one

June 27, 2018, 4:06:21 pm MDT

Refugio day one

Cross Country Camp in Texas

Greg Dinauer|Gregg Ludwig|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Larry Bunner|Refugio 2018|Rohan Taylor|video

Gregg Ludwig <<gregg.ludwig.cfi>> writes:

Day one of the Refugio Cross Country camp scheduled for Monday June 25, was rescheduled to Wednesday, the 27th. It’s been dry for several days but last week this area received about 10” of rain so we delayed arrival a couple of days. Lots of mosquitoes which may be a problem that we have to evaluate. Don’t want to land out after a nice flight only to be eaten alive. Hopeful the mosquitoes will not be as active during the afternoon.

Aerotowed between 11 AM and 1 PM.. Everybody got away. Larry Bunner, Greg Dinauer, Tyson,  Mick Howard, Nate x2, Rich, and Jonny Durand. Thick mosquitoes all day. Kimberly got hit hard by mosquitoes working the flight line. Southeast winds about 15 mph.

If anyone lands out but nearby the mosquitoes will get them. Mick thinks it will get better further down the course line, mosquitoes that is. Rich popped a weak link when I gave it the gas, he may have been ill advised.

John Durand video: https://www.instagram.com/p/BkixEUYBweP/?igshid=15ghdxnssgkgd&utm_source=fb_www_attr

Larry Bunner writes:

We had a good practice day. Refugio is very wet after the tropical depression from last week. As a result it is mosquito haven at the airport. Copious amounts of chemical are needed just to set up your glider. Just 15 miles to the north it is much drier with little standing water.

We all got off under good streets in moderate south winds 10-15 mph and stuck. Interestingly there were no clouds in Zapata today because of the south winds. Base was initially 2700’ and rose through the day as we headed north to 5400’+ and climbs over 700fpm.

I towed first and had a pleasant connect the dots flight to New Braunfels. Nathan Wreyford wound it down at San Marcos and Tyson Taylor did the same near Bastrop all well over 100 miles.

I’m not sure where Jonny (Gecko) and Mick ended up but they were keen on getting back early to be ready for tomorrow. Robin and Mick are here to fly tomorrow. We expect more wind as the week progresses and better conditions as things dry out.

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2018 Quest Air Nationals »

April 21, 2018, 8:14:52 EDT

2018 Quest Air Nationals

The happy pilots

Alejandro Riera|Andrey Solomykin|Bruce Barmakian|Christian Ciech|Corinna Schwiegershausen|Davis Straub|Fabiano Nahoum|Fred Kaemerer|Gary Anderson|Glen Volk|Greg Dinauer|Jeff Chipman|Jim Messina|John Simon|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Ken Kinzie|Kevin Carter|Konrad Heilmann|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Mike Glennon|Patrick Kruse|Phill Bloom|Quest Air|Quest Air Nationals 2018|Raul Guerra|Richard Lovelace|Roger Irby|Sara Weaver|Tullio Gervasoni|Tyler Borradaile|Zac Majors

Joerg Bajewski's photo of all of us:

All the happy pilots at the 2018 Quest Air Nationals. May include, but not limited to: Adam Smith, Adrian Sanchez, Adriano Sorci, Alejandro Riera, Alessandro Silva, Alfredo Grey, Alipio Loyola, Alvaro Figueiredo Sandoli, Andrey Solomykin, Austin Marshall, Bill Comstock, Bill Vickery, Brian Vitola, Bruce Barmakian, Carl Wallbank, Carlos Alvarado, Charles Allen, Charles Cozean, Christian Ciech, Corinna Schwiegershausen, Dan Lukaszewicz, David Aldrich, David Hayner, David Whittle, Davis Straub, Derreck Turner, Douglas Hale, enrique arriaga, Eric Williams, Erico Oliveira, Fabiano Nahoum, Fabio Thomaz, Fred Kaemerer, Gary Anderson, Giovani Tagliari, Glen Volk, Greg Dinauer, Greg Sessa, Hollidge Andrew, James Race, James Yocom, JD Guillemette, Jeff Chipman, Jim Messina, Joerg Bajewski, John Blank, John Maloney, John Simon, Jonny Durand, Jose Paulo Tavares, Jose Sandoval, Ken Kinzie, Kevin Carter, Kevin Dutt, Kevin Kernohan, Konrad Heilmann, Krzysztof Grzyb, Larry Bunner, Lee Silver, Makbule Baldik Le Fay, Malcolm Brown, Marcello Pereira, Marcelo Alexandre Menin, Mark Bourbonnais, Michael Duffy, Michael Williams, Mick Howard, Miguel Molina, Mike Glennon, Misael Rosalez, Nick Jones, Patrick Kruse, Patrick Pannese, Patrick Ruber, Pedro L. Garcia, Peter Kelley, Peter Suchanek, Philippe Michaud, Phill Bloom, Raul Guerra, Ricardo Ricky, Ricardo Vassmer, Rich Cizauskas, Rich Reinauer, Richard lovelace, Richard Milla, Rick Maddy, Rob Dallas, Robert Clarkson, Rod Regier, Rodrigo Russek, Roger Irby, Sandy Dittmar, Sara Weaver, Sergey Kataev, Soraya Rios, Stephan Mentler, Steve Hogan, Tullio Gervasoni, Tyler Borradaile, Will Ramsey, William Baker, Zac Majors

The photo is live.

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Going long in Florida

April 7, 2018, 9:24:49 EDT

Going long in Florida

Five and a half hours in the air, and 184 kilometers

Greg Dinauer

The forecasts presented a puzzle. The winds weren't strong enough to force a task to the north, but they where a little stronger than one would like to have a long local task like around the Green Swamp. Add to that NAM and RAP disagree on the winds, which is usually not the case. After going back and forth we decided to travel up northwest of Interstate 75 and then head north to Lake City, a small private airfield (185 km) A couple of pilots needing to stay local would attempt to go around the Green Swamp.

There were a few thin wisps around as we prepared to launch at noon. The forecast was for no cu's but that is so rare on a day with southeast winds. You definitely want them if you want to go around the Green Swamp.

Larry had focused on going as early as possible and was first off. I went second at 12:02 with Greg Dinauer and Will Ramsey a bit later. I pinned off a bit early at 1,500' in 200 fpm to 3,000'.

I followed Larry to the north to Groveland but we didn't find much. There were hardly any cu's to the north. I turned back to go toward a cu back over Quest. Greg was turning in lift a bit to the southwest. I was the lowest.

While Larry and Greg thermalled to the northwest of Quest I headed for the cu on the south side. As soon as I got there, bam, 600 fpm up. A few turns and I called out to them although they could easily see what was happening. It wasn't long before I left at 4,000'. They were right behind.

There were now a few cu's to the north. I went just to the northwest of Groveland to them, and bam, another 600-700 fpm thermal. I left at 4,600' with Will and Greg circling below, headed west-northwest to find Larry under another cu and we left together at 4,600'.

There were a few wispy cu's way to the north I went for them. It was a 10 kilometer glide at 17:1, so I got there reasonably high at 2,700' to get under the cu in lift that averaged 200 fpm. I wasn't going to be convinced by the first two good thermals that I needed 600 fpm to stay up. Larry came in low from his line to the east and we were soon joined by Will and Greg. I hung out at cloud base so that we could be all together.

The wind was mostly out of the east at 8 mph. Our task was to the north, but we needed to get further west to clear Ocala airspace later to the north, so going with the wind a bit was no problem. We worked weak climbs south of the Okahumpka service plaza on the Turnpike then headed west-northwest under more substantial cu's to get toward the intersection of I75 and the Turnpike. Down below it looked like a huge traffic jam with everyone leaving the state to go back home.

Looking to the north and northwest from our perch over I75 under the cu's there were no more cu's. There was a thick inversion with white moist air under it. I wondered if the day was about to be over.

After a 10 kilometer glide to the northwest I was down to 1,900' northwest of the truck stop on highway 44 and I75. Greg was way below me surfing the high tension lines. Will was just behind and I got a glimpse of him circling and went back to join him. Larry was three kilometers to our east on the east side of I75 slowly climbing.

Larry joined Will and I as we climbed at almost 300 fpm to 4,600'. We had the treed expanse of Marion Oaks to our northwest along the course line. We wanted to get high enough to keep ourselves safe. Greg was climbing up below us but would only get to 3,800'.

The three of us together worked over Marion Oaks and found lift along the way. There are a huge set of open fields on the west side of Marion Oaks and I wanted to be sure to get there high as there is another required jump to the northwest from there.

Leaving the lift from 4,400' we headed for the open expanse. My glide ratio fell to 9:1 with a 9 mph tail wind. The vario averaged 370 fpm down. By the time I got to the northern edge of landable fields I was down to 2,700'. The next landable field was 5 kilometers to the north first over trees and then over houses. I wasn't willing to risk it. I didn't see the fire that Larry spotted when he went across at 3,000' and found a boomer.

Turning back I went on search for some lift coming out of the open fields below. Will was with me but hadn't ever been here before. Down to 1,400' the 50 fpm thermal helped but we were drifting quickly to the northwest from the northwest corner of the open fields at 1,900'.

Turning back again against the east wind, I went on search again assuming that we would be landing soon. Bam. 500 fpm at 1,200'. I climbed to 4,000' in lift that averaged 300 fpm. Will didn't quite get the best part of the lift, didn't quite get high enough to head north and soon landed. Greg had also landed in the open fields.

As I took off over the non-landable areas the sink was very light I was getting 20:1 to the northwest as I headed for the edge of the 8 km cylinder around Dunnellon that keeps us out of Ocala airspace. Larry finally came back on the radio to say that he had been very low and drifted west way into the cylinder but was getting up again. I kept finding spots of pleasant lift and just turning in it to enjoy the air and the day.

A few cu's formed to my west. Larry was under them and rocketing up at 600 fpm. He climbed to 6,000' a few kilometers up the course line from me. They were a bit far for me to get to so I kept heading north-northwest. Larry and I were in good radio communication. Earlier interference issues were now passed us and Larry was spotting thermals in front of me.

No cu's but good thermals as I headed for Williston and slowly caught up with Larry while climbing to 5,100'. The wind was 7 mph out of the southeast. There were little backyard fires along the way and Larry found one over a lumber mill southeast of Williston. I came in and joined him after a ten kilometer glide at 17:1 and we climbed together at over 400 fpm to 5,900' just east of the airfield. We could see the carnival down below north of the field that we usually land in.

We headed north on what turned out to be a 20 kilometer glide. The last 5 kilometers was over a forested area with high tension lines. I was down to 2,900' on the south end of this area. I could see what looked like an open field to the north and thought that I could make it there. Larry was just ahead and a tiny bit higher.

I crossed over the northern edge of the forest at 800' and headed for the northern edge of the field to set up my approach. Larry called out 100 fpm north of the field, but I was too low to join him and told him so. As I came to the north edge of the field down to 600' AGL, bam, 400 fpm. I turned and was rocked. It was rough as guts, but I really didn't want to land in this field.

I was screaming and screaming up at the same time. I couldn't leave the lift but I didn't want to be in it. Larry came back under me and it was nice to have a partner in hell. I told him how rough it was to let him know I wasn't completely in charge of where I was flying.

We climbed to 3,100' then Larry spotted the cu that was forming from our thermal a bit to our east. That one got us to 6,100' at over 300 fpm. We were just southwest of Gainsville and we could see a huge expanse of trees ahead. After our close call over trees we charted a course over more open areas to the north.

The wind had turned south-southwest. There were now and then the isolated wisp of a cu. We kept heading for them and they worked because they only appeared when there was lift and soon disappeared. There were cu's to our west but out of reach, but approaching us.

We now were able to stay high and climb up to 6,000' again. Cu's kept popping up in front of us. The cu's from the west got closer and we were able to tag a couple for light lift. Climbing to 5,600' we went on glide from 17 kilometers out and made it easily with Larry in first.

The Lake City field is a private airfield and very nice. You land going right over the house low.

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/6.4.2018/16:02

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2018 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

March 22, 2018, 8:14:26 EDT

2018 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Many informative seminars

Christian Ciech|Davis Straub|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Larry Bunner|Owen Morse|Steve Kroop|Tom Lanning|video|weather|Zac Majors

I dislike the fact that we have had three days of bad flying weather. Florida weather is usually very consistent and we average 5½ flying days during a competition over a seven day period. We likely will get 4 days of flying. Also some flying days are vastly superior to others and we have had some great flying days during previous Green Swamp Sport Klassics. But so far not this year.

To keep pilots from committing hari-kari we have Mitch's landing clinic (which did get in some flights before the wind picked up on Wednesday). He has also been lecturing to packed houses about landings.

Jonny and Zac had a joint seminar going back and forth answering pilots' questions. Tom Lanning spoke on cross country by the numbers. Larry Bunner gave a class on Skew-T charts. Christian Ciech answered pilot questions in a simple and straight forward manner to so many pilots that there wasn't room to get around. Steve Kroop from Flytec USA held pilots in the palm of his hand for four hours, also showing off new products from Naviter that will be available by the end of May. He almost didn't get them back. Owen Morse gave a short lesson on juggling.

Mitch is doing a landing clinic every morning using the electric winch tow with videos of each landing for stop action reviews.

Some of us took up other sports during the windy Wednesday:

Heather Simon, John Simon, Zac Majors, Davis Straub, Augusto, Greg Dinauer, Rick Cizauskas

Heather Simon, John Simon, Zac Majors, Davis Straub, Augusto, Greg Dinauer, and in the middle Rick Cizauskas. The day was topped off by a rousing night of hard core karaoke. The guys are already doing the landing clinic at 8:04 AM.

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2018 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

March 19, 2018, 10:10:15 pm EDT

2018 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Day one, task one

Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|John Alden|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wallaby Ranch|weather|Wills Wing

Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|Greg Dinauer|John Alden|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wallaby Ranch|weather|Wills Wing

Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|Greg Dinauer|John Alden|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Tim Delaney|Wallaby Ranch|weather|Wills Wing

competition|Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|Greg Dinauer|John Alden|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Tim Delaney|Wallaby Ranch|weather|Wills Wing

competition|Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2018|Greg Dinauer|John Alden|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Tim Delaney|Wallaby Ranch|weather|Wills Wing

https://airtribune.com/2018-green-swamp-sport-klassic/results

https://airtribune.com/2018-green-swamp-sport-klassic/blog__day_2

The forecast was for 10 mph west northwest winds on the ground with higher winds aloft. Not a great direction and strength for a king-posted competition. None the less we persisted.

The forecast also showed no cu's but Larry Bunner, our weather guy for the competition, dismissed that as nonsense and sure enough at 11 AM during the pilot task briefing the cu's started showing up just to our north and soon the sky was full of them.

Given the forecast for moderately strong westerly winds with a north component, the task committee set a task to Wallaby Ranch to our southeast, but to keep pilots away from landing in areas with locked gates (Branson Ranch south of east/west highway 474), they set a 3 kilometer turn point at the round-a-about at the intersection of Dean Still and highway 33. Making this turnpoint would be difficult for king-posted gliders because of the wind.

We had two launch lines setup at the east end of the east/west runway. This required that the Dragonflies land to our southeast and then taxi across to the launch area, which slowed things down a bit. None the less the pilots were off in an hour. There were a few reflights, but given the conditions they were pretty minimal.

This wind direction and strength makes for rowdy conditions below 500' and pilots really need to be on top of the situation while on tow to make sure that they don't get knocked off to one side or the other. I was very happy to see that pilots responded well and all launched safely. All the pilots with reflights also landed in the designated area and were picked up and hauled back to launch by David Finn.

With Eric Williams directing tug traffic and after an initial hesitation pilots moved off the staging lines and into the launch line quickly. Each line had numerous official helpers with yellow safety vests on, who made sure that the pilots were ready to go before they got to the launch box. Safety of the launch is a major concern here at Quest Air.

The lift conditions were strong. I was going up at 1,300 fpm on tow with Zhenya towing me and pinned off at 1,400'. The lift was right at the west end of the runway. I was seeing 700 fpm on the 20 second averager on the Flytec 6030. My team launched almost last at 5 minutes to 3 PM. The thermal averaged 360 fpm.

With the wind averaging 12 mph I was quickly drifting to the east southeast as I climbed to 4,200'. I launched first with my team, but I was quickly losing track of them as we would not be able to get together in this wind. Andrey was below me and climbing.

Our tactic was to go west to get upwind and to the southwest "corner" of the 5 km start cylinder which was centered 3 km west of Quest. Given that we all knew our plan I headed upwind in that direction hoping to meet up with the rest of the team assuming that they got towed high. Unfortunately, while the lift was great over Quest and to the east, downwind of the course line, there was little lift upwind to the spot that we had designated. I had to drift back in light lift still in the start cylinder and hope to find my guys. No luck.

There were a number of competitors and mentors in the air and combined with the prevalence of cumulus clouds spotting the lift was not that difficult.  With the 12 mph west northwest wind, staying in the lift was more of a chore than on light wind days. The thermals were broken and choppy with quickly varying locations. Combine that with the fact that they were relatively weak and it made for cautious flying on my part at least.

The tactic that we agreed upon was to stay upwind of the course line west of highway 33, but that was soon abandoned given the need to stay in lift and the wind. I was calling out my location and climb rates, not that it necessarily did any good for my team members, but I could hope. I was only able to get to 3,500' or lower so that added to the thrill.

I was climbing up from 2,700' just south of the glider port when Zippy and Owen with two other gliders came in under me, Zippy was easy to spot flying an all red glider. I had climbed about 500' and then decided to leave when the lift stopped, but said to myself, "wait a minute, why don't I stick with these guys and try to help them out?".

I went back over them and promptly lost 500'. Owen would later tell me he was not aware of any lift that they were circling in.

Down to 2,600' I headed south southwest toward a reasonable looking cu about a kilometer away. I saw those guys going to the south southeast, which did not look that good to me. That next thermal provided 270 fpm to 3,200'.

I looked over to the east as I drifted in that direction and there was a red glider on the ground. The remnants of the four person gaggle that had come under me was circling in the neighborhood. That thermal seemed weak so I head further downwind to better looking cu's and found 240 fpm to 4,500'. I was still nineteen kilometers from goal at Wallaby Ranch, still had to go 8 kilometers a bit upwind (13 mph) to get the turnpoint and the Flytec 6030 displayed me not quite having enough altitude to make goal.

I headed for a lone cu that looked okay half way to the turn point. That got me back to 3,900'. Two kilometers from the turnpoint and I watched one of the competitors turning just to the south of Dean Still. The lift looked good ahead. As soon as I made the turnpoint my 6030 showed I had goal by 1,600' from 10 kilometers out at 3,000' with a 13 mph tail wind.

I had seen scattered gliders down along the way in friendly looking fields. There was a green king-posted glider circling ahead of me over two gliders down in the last field before Wallaby. Looks like they just didn't have quite enough altitude to make it.

A good number of competitors made it to goal. We are scoring the sport class pilots flying topless gliders separately from those flying king-posted gliders.

King-posted task:

# Name Glider Time Distance Total
1 Lee Silver Wills Wing U2 160 01:04:32 39.78 669
2 Matt Pruett Wills Wing U2 145 01:08:25 39.78 630
3 Eric Kriner Wills Wing U2 160 01:08:53 39.78 627
4 Willie Van Caulart Wills Wing U2 160 01:09:14 39.78 624
4 Tim Delaney Wills Wing Ultrasport 137 01:16:15 39.78 624
6 John Alden Wills Wing U2 145 01:10:55 39.78 614
7 Max Kotchouro Wills Wing Sport 2 155 01:21:55 39.78 598
8 Chris Chaney Wills Wing U2 145 01:25:10 39.78 549
9 Rich Reinauer Wills Wing U2 145 01:35:48 39.78 511
10 Thor Froh Wills Wing U2 145   37.51 407
11 Richard Milla Wills Wing U2 145   37.29 405

Topless:

# Name Glider Time Total
1 Oded Kalir Atos VQ 00:52:31 611
2 Austin Marshall Wills Wing T2C 144 01:01:05 589
3 Ricardo Vassmer Moyes RX 4 01:09:01 518

The Monday task was cancelled due to forecast for no lift and 50% chance of rain this afternoon. It is sunny now at Quest but dark clouds just to the north. Greg Dinauer got this shot at around 7:30 AM before the gust front came through:

North clouds about here now.

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Clockwise around the Green Swamp

February 15, 2018, 10:32:24 pm EST

Clockwise around the Green Swamp

Such a pleasant day to be in the air.

Belinda Boulter|Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Larry Bunner|Rob Clarkson|sailplane

Belinda Boulter|Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Rob Clarkson|sailplane

Belinda Boulter|Evgeniya "Zhenya" Laritskaya|Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Rob Clarkson|sailplane

I called an FAI triangle around the Green Swamp, first heading southwest (intersection of highways 98 and 471) then north northwest (seven kilometer circle around the intersection of highway 98 and Interstate 75), and finally back to Quest. Five pilots were ready for the challenge, Larry Bunner, Greg Dinauer, Rob Clarkson, Ken Kenzie, and me.

The forecast was for light winds which is why I chose the Green Swamp task. The RAP 13 forecast for lift showed little to none, so I just went with the NAM 3 forecast which showed good lift. It seemed like it would be a good day at 10 AM when I made the call on the task, so why not choose the strongest forecast. The cu's started forming around noon starting from the south.

Greg was off first and I was right behind him at 1:05 PM. I hung in light lift under a dark flat cu as Greg climbed to the east of me. He headed southwest as I climbed to 3,300'. Cloud base was a bit low for a romp around the swamp.

As I headed southwest Greg was coming back having fallen down to less than 2,000' AGL. There were plenty of cu's ahead so it was a game of connecting the dots. It looked like Larry launched last after Rob and Ken, but we had two tugs running so everything was happening quickly.

I headed south along highway 33 not heading along the course line, staying over open territory until it looked like we could get a bit higher to make the big jumps. I came upon a number of sailplanes marking the lift near the Seminole Sailplane port as the cloud base rose.

I could see and hear Larry to my west a couple of kilometers closer to the course line and higher. Eleven kilometers from the first turnpoint Larry in front headed more south in the direction of the turnpoint as I decided to head further west under the cu's. I found 600 fpm and quickly got to over 4,100'. Since there were just trees below it was great to be that high.

I headed for the turnpoint and Larry came in under me  and 4 km from the turnpoint we climbed up. I left at 4,200' and Larry continued to climb.

There were small cu's  west of the turnpoint away from the course line. The cu's over the course line looked a bit too far away and over treed territory. I found 300 fpm to 4,300' and then headed north northwest toward the purple pond that stores the effluent from the chicken houses. You can smell the thermal there at over 300 fpm to 4,100'.

I was staying over the Green Swamp away from the landing areas. I saw a dark cloud further into the Swamp and decided to head in with a good chance to find good lift. Larry came in 200' over me and found the lift also.

The cu's were lined up heading right for the turnpoint and Larry was out in front leading the way. Seven kilometers before the optimized point on the 7 km radius we climbed to 4,600' 255 fpm. The cu's were dark, but very flat.

We quickly got to the turnpoint and headed northwest to get under a row of cu's going to the east. Larry was calling out the lift and I climbed to 5,000' right after he did. Larry headed to a good looking cu over the trees south of the lumber mill at 50 and 471. As I approached him I spotted a bird and stopped to climb. Larry saw this and came back quickly to get under me.

Larry headed out below me as I climbed to over 4,900'. I followed him east as we flew over the Green Swamp and headed for the edge and landable areas. Larry found 200 fpm over the Van Fleet trail and I came in over him. The lift was smooth and light and it looked like we had no problem making it back to Quest Air.

I let Larry go first far below me and just hung around to make sure that I would make it. We had no problem getting in. Just the two of us made it in.

https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/15.2.2018/18:05#fd=route

Belinda, Davis, Larry, and Rob at goal. Photo by Evgeniya Laritskaya.

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Quest Air picnic tables in the dark

February 14, 2018, 8:33:14 EST

Quest Air picnic tables in the dark

Glowing

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air

Thanks to Greg Dinauer.

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Dribbling downstream

February 10, 2018, 11:31:24 pm EST

Dribbling downstream

Using the wind to carry us along on a weak day

CIVL|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Rob Clarkson

CIVL|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Rob Clarkson

CIVL|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Rob Clarkson

CIVL|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Rob Clarkson

CIVL|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Rob Clarkson

CIVL|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Rob Clarkson

https://airtribune.com/2018-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_5

With my glider already setup for the last week I was trying to get the rest of the crew around here motivated for a nice flight downwind to Williston, 109 km. I don't want to fly unless I've had some pilots with me to make it a collective affair. I corralled Larry Bunner, Greg Dinauer, and Rob Clarkson. John Simon was out flying an airliner, and Mitch Shipley just got back from the CIVL Plenary.

I was suited up and ready to launch at 1 PM. The forecast was for zero lift to our north by Ocala at 4 PM. I wanted to get going, but somehow the myth started that cloud base was only 2,500'. Hogwash.

I just couldn't get these guys to the starting gate. It took until 2 PM before there was movement. I got to the line first a little rushed as I had taken everything off after no one would join me.

It was a little rough getting out of the field with the 12 mph south southeast wind, but it smoothed out once we got over the tree height. Certainly well within the parameters from many previous tows. The lift was gentle after I pinned off at 2,200' and I just drifted along back toward the field.

Larry came up next and found better lift to the north so I joined him. We climbed to 4,500' waiting for Greg and Rob, but they were just taking too long to get going so we headed off.

With the strong wind it took no time at all to get up to the Turnpike. Larry and I took turns leading out. I had caught my harness zipper on the string that pulls it so I couldn't close up the lower half of the harness. But it wasn't that cold so after a while I forgot about it.

With the wind mostly south and not southeast, our goal at Williston was not straight downwind. We had to push west across streets to get more in line with the course line. Heading up I75 Larry took off over Marion Oaks toward the northwest. I was high and saw a dark street to the north that would take me over the Ocala airfield (and airspace) but put me 10 km east of the course line. Given that I was high above airspace and it looked like I could stay that way under the street I went for it. It was blue out to the west with few cu's.

The forecast was for no lift at all around 4 PM west of Ocala. I was right over the Ocala airport a little before 4 PM at cloud base at 4,800'. The top of the airspace is 1,500' MSL. Larry was working to the north northwest to get to the further west cloud street.

My clouds kept taking me further north as the goal at Williston kept getting more west than north. Larry was doing better finding weak lift (like me) further west. Still he was having a hard time getting far enough to the west.

Finally I made a run for it from weak lift at 4,300' heading west toward some rising smoke. The smoke didn't work out but the area was buoyant and I ended up just a little more than 3 KM short of goal. Larry found enough lift to get him into goal with good altitude.

Not bad for a day that was not supposed to be very soarable.

Tomorrow it's a 50 mile road bike ride before the afternoon rain.

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Not around the Green Swamp

February 1, 2018, 9:35:19 pm EST

Not around the Green Swamp

We set a task, but the day was not quite right

Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wills Wing

John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wills Wing

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wills Wing

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wills Wing

https://airtribune.com/play/3045/2d

https://airtribune.com/2018-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_2

The forecast was good but then high clouds came over. Combined with the cu's they made for a very dark ground.

The lift was spotty and broken and often weak. When we got above 4,000' it was bitterly cold even with five layers.

I pinned off at 1,000' AGL in light lift launching just before 1 PM with Zenya as the tow pilot. John Simon and Greg Dinauer took extra time to get going. Larry Bunner showed up just before I launched.

I hung around waiting for John and Greg and then we finally climbed up to 4,600' and headed west following John who was still hot to do the long around the Green Swamp task. His radio wasn't working so we couldn't tell him that we were thinking of going to the lumber yard at highway 50 and 471 and then back.

We all glided together, me on a Wills Wing T2C 144, Greg on an Aeros Combat, and John on an Aeros Combat. Our glide ratios were identical.

I found some lift west of Mascotte that John missed and Greg joined me. While John struggled we stayed high. We found even better lift at 340 fpm on average to 4,800' further west as John still struggled.

Diving into the lumber yard, the lift was weak there but we worked it as John got better lift to the north. He came in over us and headed west to see if he could continue the task as Greg and I worked to get up enough to head back to Quest.

There is a long stretch of trees that John was not high enough to cross so he came back and then landed just east of the lumber yard. I got up higher than Greg and headed east back to the mines that produces lift for us on the way out. Down to 1,700' AGL I worked 130 fpm back to over 4,100'.

Greg didn't get up and landed near where I climbed out. I headed back toward Quest Air with 11:1 glide radio required. Unfortunately heading south east meant into a bit of a southerly head wind and I was often getting 6:1. I landed just south of Mascotte in a big field that I had picked out previously.

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Quest Air late December flying

December 27, 2017, 9:35:19 pm EST

Quest Air late December flying

Smooth air

Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air

On Tuesday Greg Dinauer got to 4,000' in 350 fpm lift. He said it got better after 3:30 PM and the lift lasted until 5 PM (sundown is 5:30 PM).

Wednesday I got out to launch with Greg, but the beautiful cu's which were to the south with one or two over us went away at the high clouds came in from the north. We had extended sled rides in sweet air.

The daily high temperatures are descending from the eighties and high seventies to the high sixties starting Saturday.

Photo by Connie Bailey.

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More boy toys at Quest Air

December 20, 2017, 8:18:01 EST

More boy toys at Quest Air

New Holland

Quest Air|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air|Wilotree Park

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air|Wilotree Park

Photo by Greg Dinauer at twilight. We are lucky to have additional heavy machinery to work on Wilotree Park. This drives like a tank (that's what they tell me). Foot pedals for the forks. Many different front end pieces. It has treads like a tank.

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500 fpm up to 4000'

December 18, 2017, 5:53:48 pm EST

500 fpm up to 4000'

Greg Dinauer flying at Quest Air today

Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air

The sky was full of cu's today as the temperature climbed above 80 degrees. My glider is in Missouri, but Jim Prahl is picking it up now. The winds were light out of the southeast.

The forecast for tomorrow is for 83 degrees Fahrenheit. 79 on Christmas day.

Gotta love this global warming.

Greg had to come down as he was freezing. He did not expect to get above 2,500' and therefore did not put on enough clothes.

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2017 Midwest, the organizers' thoughts »

June 12, 2017, 6:14:35 CST GMT-0500

2017 Midwest, the organizers' thoughts

At least Greg Dinauer's

Dragonfly|Facebook|Jamie Shelden|Midwest 2017|weather

Dragonfly|Facebook|Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Midwest 2017|weather

Dragonfly|Facebook|Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Midwest 2017|weather

Greg Dinauer <<gdinauer>> writes:

Organizing a major sanctioned hang gliding competition is something that Larry, Kris and I have always talked about and, indeed have attempted in the past. Plagued by low turnouts, and of course, the always dubious weather up here in the Midwest, we just lost interest.

This year we finally decided to give it another go. With the lack of sanctioned competitions, due to the complexity of negotiating the minefield of insurance imperatives, and the huge gap in years of having any large scale events like this, we agreed it was a perfect storm of wide open doors.

In October we started drawing up plans. Since then every door has opened, even though the insurance hurtle almost discouraged us out of it. We always had the back-up plan that if only 20-25 pilots signed up and we skimped on everything, we could just pull it off without having to dig too deeply into our new glider funds.

So when after merely five days of the event registration being open, I received a late night call from Larry and Kris confirming that we had 60 registered pilots, I felt like the co-inventor of some unique product that just went nationwide overnight.

Of course we had to have another meeting at Larry’s home (the geographical midpoint) to access what to do about the monster we created. We wanted to limit it to 60, but before we knew it there were 80 pilots registered. So we had to draw a sharp line in the form of strict deadlines to control every ones flying sickness for this event. The glee we shared with the break in the really gloomy weather in the upper Midwest over the prior month well; it was just another of those open doors which seemed as inexplicable as Kris’s “need” to schedule during a full moon. If he is silently gloating, he deserves to be.

In as much as we considered every contingency, now that the competition is over, there were weak places; places that we could have better addressed, had we not also been competitors ourselves. Better communication with the launch process volunteer staff, management of civilities like: the portable bathrooms and waste containers, and the damp condition of the ground, particularly on the first day, are among them.

With all that, the pilots’ response was overwhelmingly positive, and while the soaring was not particularly epic, we did have one or two good days along with some challenging ones.

I really want to say that the three of us never scuffled with each other over decisions or ideas (often done over Larry’s favorite beer), in spite of the daunting insurance mitigation forms that Larry labored endlessly over. Our individual tasks in this came about more or less naturally; just three flying buddies cooperating to make a bigger dream happen.

We want to again thank everyone including the pilots, tug pilots, all the selfless volunteers, and the (more than patient) local pilot community for participating in what we feel was a bit more like what these events use to be. I, for one, while watching Rhett’s vivid green dragonfly depart this morning couldn’t help but feel a bit sad to see it end.

Will we do it again next year? We’ll see. A lot of the busy work is done and as with Jamie, Davis and other organizers in the past, we have learned a lot.

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2017 Midwest, day 6, task 5 »

June 9, 2017, 10:57:55 pm CST GMT-0500

2017 Midwest, day 6, task 5

The luck can be good or bad

Facebook|James Stinnett|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|video|Zac Majors

Facebook|James Stinnett|John Simon|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|video|Zac Majors

Facebook|Greg Dinauer|James Stinnett|John Simon|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|video|Zac Majors

Bruce Barmakian|Facebook|Greg Dinauer|James Stinnett|John Simon|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|video|Zac Majors

Bruce Barmakian|Facebook|Greg Dinauer|James Stinnett|John Simon|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|video|Zac Majors

Zac Majors called a task to the east given the west winds.

Here is the forecast for the day:

NWS forecast: Mostly sunny, with a high near 81. Northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Hourly shows north northwest surface winds at 9 mph.

NAM 3 forecast:

1 PM:

Lift: 500 fpm
TOL: 3,600’ (RAP 13 – 5,000’)
Cloudbase: No cu’s
Surface winds: northwest 8 mph
TOL wind: northwest 16 mph

4 PM:

Lift: 600 fpm TOL: 5,000’
Cloudbase: No cu’s or cu’s at 5,600’
Surface winds: northwest 5 mph
TOL wind: west northwest 12 mph

Op40:

TOL: 5,000’
55 degrees
North northwest wind 6 – 10 mph
Reasonable chance of cu’s
Winds move to more westerly later in the day

The cu's were forming as we got pulled up into the air at 1:20 PM. The lift was weak under the cu's but we just held on and climbed slowly getting up to cloud base which was low at 5,000' as forecasted.

Up and down in the weak lift as we tried to stay near cloudbase. I lost track of the time for a few minutes and then realized I was out of place as the start window approached. Found 300 fpm and climbed back to over 5,000' but I was three kilometers from the edge of the start cylinder when the window opened.

Niki was right under me and I told her that I was going to take the first start clock despite being way behind. She decided to wait for the next start window.

I figured that I could use the pilots ahead to mark the thermals and if they slowed down I could catch them.

There was a cu-filled sky to the southeast but quite a ways off the course line to the north. I followed behind the lead gaggle until I lost most of them by the third thermal. The lift was still weak for me and I'd gain 1,000' before running off to the next one as I got near cloud base.

After climbing to 4,900' in the third thermal it was clear that I would have to venture out into the blue to the south to get near the course line and because basically there were no more cu's any where near the direction to the first turnpoint. Raul Guerra had joined me and we spread out looking for little forming wispies.

We found one but it provided only 129 fpm to 4,800'. We headed due south to the next forming wispies and down to 1,400' AGL and after searching around we connected. This thermal was almost 300 fpm and we hung on until 6,400'. The wind was perfect and we drifted right to the turnpoint as we climbed.

Greg Dinauer had come in under us. We heard later that he had lost his flight instrument and was relying on us to tell him where the lift was. He was circling right with us and climbing right with us even though we would have been very hard for him to see.

It was a short glide to the next turnpoint at Burlington airport and while there were little bits of lift we didn't stay but for a few turns before heading to the Bong turnpoint to the southeast. We probably should have worked the available lift a bit more and gained some altitude, but the cu's ahead looked good as did the dry fields below them.

Soon I was on search mode big time. I had lost track of Raul and needed any lift to keep me in the air. Heading over a series of drier fields I felt a little bump. I pushed back upwind into the 7 mph northwest wind and the lift improved. It was weak and broken at first but I was going up from 800' AGL.

I gained about 1,000' and then James Stinnett came in under me at 350' AGL. He was very happy to see me going up. We climbed to 5,100' at almost 300 fpm on average and again drifted toward the turnpoint to the east.

I noticed that a number of pilots who were ahead of us had landed out. As James and I topped out I saw Raul about a 1,000' below us heading for the goal. My 6030 said we had goal by over 1,000' so James and I went on glide.

It's 20 kilometers to the goal but there is a 2km goal cylinder to keep us away from the airfield as it is a drop zone.

There were no clouds a little past the turnpoint at Bong so I was a little cautious at first. Then sped up as I saw that my glide ratio greatly exceeded the required glide ratio and I was not hitting any big sink. It was a breeze making it into goal.

As I worked my way down from 1,000' AGL I noticed that the pilot before me landed going east. The wind had been out of the west or northwest the whole flight. I wondered what's going on.

I had not looked out to the east to see Lake Michigan. There was a sea breeze and that is why all the guys in the first gaggle other than John Simon and Bruce Barmakian are on the ground (or so it appears). James and I got high at the turnpoint, higher than most pilots so we had no problem dealing with the sea breeze.

Zac talks about his flight here: https://www.facebook.com/zacmajors/videos/vb.584324602/10155349211799603/?type=2&theater

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2017 Midwest, day 3, task 2 »

June 6, 2017, 10:00:27 pm CST GMT-0500

2017 Midwest, day 3, task 2

A sky full of cu's

Greg Dinauer|Jeff Chipman|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Larry Bunner|Midwest 2017|Niki Longshore|Raul Guerra|Robin Hamilton

The forecast for the day:

NWS forecast: Sunny, with a high near 74. Northeast wind 5 to 15 mph.

North northeast surface wind, 13 – 15 mph noon through 3 PM, 11 mph after that.

NAM3 forecast:

1 PM:

Lift: 597 fpm (other models similar)
TOL: 5,632’ (other models similar)
Cloudbase: No cu’s (All other models show no cu’s except NAM 12, which shows TOL 1,000’ higher)
Surface wind: north northeast 11 mph (other models show 9 – 15 mph)
TOL wind: north northeast 19 mph (other models vary between 15 and 23 mph)

4 PM:

Lift: 577 fpm (other models vary between 398 and 736 fpm)
TOL: 5,964’ (other models vary between 5,301’ and 7,289’)
Cloudbase: No cu’s or 6,000’
Surface wind: north northeast 12 mph (other models vary between 9 and 12 mph)
TOL wind: north northeast 14 mph (other models vary between 14 and 19 mph)

SkySight (between 1 PM and 4 PM):

Lift: 400 – 450 fpm
TOL: 4,000’ – 6,000’ (6,000’ – 7,000’ to the south later)
Cloudbase: No cu’s
Surface wind: north northeast 8 – 12 mph
TOL wind: north northeast early at 20 – 22 mph calming to 14 – 16 mph later

OP40:

1 PM:

TOL: 6,700’
42 degrees
North northeast wind 11 mph at surface level and 18 mph at TOL
Thin cu’s possible

4 PM:

TOL: 7,700’
39 degrees
North northeast wind 11 mph at surface level to 14 mph at TOL
Thin cu’s possible

Actually the cu's formed early and they were maybe 1,000' thick and very plentiful.

Niki Longshore, Larry Bunner, Raul Guerra, Greg Dinauer, Kip Stone and I along with a few others took off in early bird. The lift was weak but we managed to climb to 4,700'. We had to go searching after that and hung in zero or less for a good while until Larry showed us the lift to our west, downwind. We all got under him and all climbed to 6,700'.

The wind was blowing 11 to 13 mph out of the northeast so that we were drifting rather quickly to the edge of the 15 km start cylinder so we headed back upwind to the inviting cu's. I found 180+ fpm under an expansive cu and slowly climbed up from 4,700' to 6,900' as I drifted at about the right speed downwind toward the edge of the start cylinder in time for the second clock. Larry took the first one.

Hitting the edge of the start cylinder high ten seconds after it opened was reassuring. Greg and Niki were just behind me. About twelve gliders were below. Jeff Chipman pushed out in front about 1,000' lower and I was just behind him.

The next two thermals came in quick succession at 350+ fpm to 7,000' so I was flying at first at 80 km/h downwind then 85 km/h speed over the ground with an 11 to 18 mph tail wind. We were all pushing it just leaving good lift just before cloud base.

Four kilometers before the first turnpoint we turned in 280+ fpm and I left at 6,500'. Perhaps I should have stayed longer. There were good looking cu's ahead.

On the glide from that last thermal around the turnpoint and off toward the west southwest I lost 4,000' in 16 km, down to 2,500' (1,700' AGL). Niki was nearby also low and Krzys was just above us. Robin Hamilton had gone out in front and stayed higher. He was to our north over Beloit.

Niki and I spent the next fourteen minutes working lift that at best averaged 60 fpm to 3,000', but slowly died out as we searched and searched in the 11 mph wind. Krzys got even lower just a kilometer away down to 1,000' AGL. Robin worked weak lift over the town of Beloit from 2,500' AGL. Everyone else was behind us working whatever they found from higher altitudes.

Back down to 2,500' MSL Niki and I went searching but didn't find anything. Bart Weghorst landed with us.

The whole area was very weak and pilots worked and worked to get any lift. Krzys was able to finally get up as was Robin and the rest of the pilots around us.

Looking over the flight in detail I see that I should have stayed in the lift four kilometers from the turnpoint for another 500 feet at least. I would have had thermal markers out in front if I had done so. Also there was just a bit of bad luck finding weak lift to stay in that didn't pan out.

Many pilots made goal. Some very quick. The replay is great.

https://airtribune.com/play/2518/2d

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2017 Midwest, getting ready »

May 29, 2017, 4:51:12 pm CST GMT-0500

2017 Midwest, getting ready

Bruce, Greg and I did a nice 30 mile road ride

Greg Dinauer|Midwest 2017

Greg Dinauer sends this sky picture from the airfield:

The winds were predicted to be west 40 mph at the top of lift. We took our ride on Monday early in the day and the surface winds weren't that bad. Later I road back and forth to town and it was much stronger.

https://www.strava.com/activities/1011453786

Larry says that the forecast for next week is super good. The forecast for this week is not.

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2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

March 28, 2017, 11:17:45 pm EST GMT-0400

2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Day three around the Green Swamp

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Pete Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Pete Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Pete Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Pete Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Pete Lehmann|Quest Air|sailplane|Tom Lanning

We challenge the Sport Class pilots to go around the Green Swamp given the light winds and the numerous cu's that appear after the 11 AM pilot meeting. It's a 97 km task that will take them at least three hours. The 50+ km tasks take them almost two hours.

Airtribune server was down so no Live Tracking and no scoring from Live Tracking, which on the first two days worked very well for us. Really speeds things up and cuts down a lot on the work for the pilots and scorekeeper.

We decided to send the pilots clockwise around the Green Swamp so as not to bother the sailplane pilots on the Grand Prix when they were coming into goal. But it turned out that I think a bunch of the pilots were right in the way of the gliders when they went through their start gate. Total coincidence.

With five tugs and five tug pilots and twenty nine competitors and mentors the launches go very efficiently and quickly. Quest Air is super organized and we have all these volunteers. Thanks so much to them.

We got up quickly at launch and I was with three of my four mentees. We switched teams today. Unfortunately I could not hear any of them on the radio. I have no idea if they could hear me.

I quickly lost track of my mentees and then went back five kilometers to find them. No luck at all as I searched for the T symbol on the top of gliders.

Headed south assuming that I could at least mark thermals for other pilots. Sport Class pilots like to stay in thermals way way too long, so it is easy to catch up with them. Just north of the Seminole Gliderport we interfered with the Grand Prix.

Tom Lanning was around and headed south, west of the glider port. The pilots had been for the most part too far east and weren't hugging the eastern edge of the Green Swamp as I was earlier before I finally went back and tried to find my mentees.

I headed southwest over the Green Swamp staying with the clouds and ignoring the blue hole to the south where the sport pilots kept going toward in order to feel comfortable over open fields. Of course, it was perfectly fine to go over the trees in the Green Swamp as it is always possible to bail out to the open fields if needed.

I found Pete Lehmann in his Sport 2 helping his mentee over the trees under the clouds. Heading further southwest I flew toward the turnpoint at the intersection of highway 98 and 471 at the bottom of the Green Swamp. Lots of cu's on the way. Got close to the cloud base in one and while leaving from a good distance below ran into 900 fpm and just made it before the room became white.

I was calling out the lift locations but had no idea if my mentees could hear. Going north along the west side of the Green Swamp there were thick, dark, black cu's ahead. It looked like over development. The sunny west sides were humming though and I got right back up to cloud base.

Approaching the turnpoint I was wary of cloud suck. From the shadow to the east you could tell the cu-nimb there  was quite high. It had a lower cloud base and I wanted to be sure that I could get over to open spots if it started to pull me up too much.

I also wanted to get as high as possible as the shadow was killing all the lift downwind along the course line. I also needed to get away from the shadow to the north of the course line to get to any possible lift that the cu-nimb had not destroyed.

I went toward the black monster just below the cloudbase altitude and pulled in hard when my climb rate went up. I saw that I could make it to the first break in the base. Heading northeast I soon got back over landable areas and toward the few flimsy cu's that were available. Unfortunately, they didn't work and after lots of lift and no trouble flying I was soon on the deck by the lumber yard at the top of the Green Swamp. A little later Michael Williams joined me.

Later we watched Makbule, one of my mentees come over at about 2,000'. Later she said she was worn out. Tom Lanning and John Simon, subbing for Greg Dinauer, came over later and they were the only ones to make it back to Quest as a cloud street set up.

Scoring will be late due to the Airtribune server being down.

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2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

March 27, 2017, 10:07:44 pm EST GMT-0400

2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Day two with many in goal

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Ken Kinzie|Mark Bourbonnais|weather|Wills Wing

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Ken Kinzie|Mark Bourbonnais|Sara Weaver|weather|Wills Wing

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Mark Bourbonnais|Sara Weaver|weather|Wills Wing

competition|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Mark Bourbonnais|Sara Weaver|weather|Wills Wing

competition|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Mark Bourbonnais|Sara Weaver|weather|Wills Wing

https://airtribune.com/2017-green-swamp-sport-klassic/results

# Name Glider Time km/h Total
1 Jeffrey Curtis Wills Wing Sport 2 135 01:46:22 28.4 1060
2 W. Michael Ford Wills Wing S2-175 01:46:24 28.4 1047
3 Sara Weaver Wills Wing Sport 2 135 01:50:47 27.3 969
4 Jennifer Kelly Wills Wing Sport 2 01:51:16 27.2 962
5 Ken Kinzie Wills Wing U2145 01:49:01 27.8 939
6 Makbule Baldik Le Fay Aeros Discus 01:51:24 27.2 906
7 ricardo vassmer Bautek Fizz 01:51:56 27.0 899
8 James Race WW U2 160 01:52:51 26.8 880
9 Lee Silver Wills Wing U2 160 01:58:13 25.6 834
10 Mark Bourbonnais Wills Wing T2C 136 01:47:35 28.1 771

The Wills Wing Sport 2's and the women dominated taking the first four places today. All three of my team mates (Sara, Jennifer, and Lee) made goal (as did I) and came in in the top ten.

The first place Sport 2 pilot, Jeffery Curtis got an extra 60 points because Sport2's have a negative handicap of 6% versus a U2. Michael Ford got a 47 point bonus because he was docked 1% for not having a good Live Tracking track log.

James Race also got a 1% deduction for not having a valid Airtribune track log. Mark Bourbannais got a 20% handicap for flying a Wills Wing T2C.

Cumulative:

# Name Glider T 1 T 2 Total
1 Ken Kinzie Wills Wing U2145 918 939 1857
2 James Race WW U2 160 733 880 1613
3 Mark Bourbonnais Wills Wing T2C 136 800 771 1571
4 Jeffrey Curtis Wills Wing Sport 2 135 504 1060 1564
5 W. Michael Ford Wills Wing S2-175 417 1047 1464
6 Jennifer Kelly Wills Wing Sport 2 469 962 1431
7 ricardo vassmer Bautek Fizz 489 899 1388
8 Makbule Baldik Le Fay Aeros Discus 470 906 1376
9 Lee Silver Wills Wing U2 160 518 834 1352
10 Sara Weaver Wills Wing Sport 2 135 378 969 1347

This was the forecast for the day:

2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic, Monday, March 27th

National Weather Service forecast:

Sunny, with a high near 85. Calm wind becoming east around 5 mph in the afternoon.

RAP forecast:

2 PM
700 - 1,000 fpm lift
6,000' - 8,000' top of lift
No cu's or 5,000' to 6,000' cloudbase
7 mph east northeast wind at 2,000'
5 mph east northeast wind at 30'

5 PM
500 - 700 fpm lift
6,000' - 8,000' top of lift
No cu's or 6,000'- 7,000' cloudbase
7 mph east northeast wind at 2,000'

Op40 at 2 PM shows moderate inversion at 4,500', cumulus clouds at 6,500' right at the top of lift, so thin and scattered if at all, 52 degrees at 6,200', East northeast wind 6 mph.

SkySight is not showing cu's until later around 3 PM as top of lift rises.

But we saw cumulus development right from the morning and it lasted all day but not every where. It certainly helped us on our task.

Our task took us to Center Hill to the north west and then west to Chin, 56 kilometers. With the northeast wind we wondered if the first leg would be a bit difficult, but with lots of lift, plenty of cu's and the help of the mentors many pilots got going and didn't have that much trouble. The wind varied from 5 to 20 mph out of the east northeast.

It is difficult to keep your mentees together even when you are all towed up together. Lee couldn't hear his radio so I was useless to him unless he saw me marking lift. I had reasonably okay communication with Sara and Jen, but it was always hard to actually hear what their situation was. I could spot Sara often and apparently Jennifer also.

Greg Dinauer put 18" team symbols in black tape on each mentee's glider. That helps a lot, but they are hard to see at 3,000' separation.

The lift was rock and roll again but I did have one completely smooth thermal that averaged 767 fpm throughout the whole thermal. We were very often at cloud base (as the Sport Class pilots stay in lift until they get as high as possible) getting about 6,500'.

The gaggles were light, but it was great to have plenty of fellow fliers around. I hung back and chose to wait and see if my mentees would show up, which they did, so I would get pretty cold at cloudbase.

There was a stretch near goal where pilots had to be careful and work whatever they could to stay up as cirrus clouds came over from the west and cut down on the cu's. It was great to see that so many made goal including all the mentors.

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2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

March 25, 2017, 7:53:49 pm EST GMT-0400

2017 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Practice Day

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Quest Air|sailplane|weather

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|John Simon|Quest Air|sailplane|weather

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|sailplane|weather

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2017|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|sailplane|weather

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_23

The forecast in the morning:

2017 Quest Cross Country, Saturday, March 25th

National Weather Service forecast:

Mostly sunny, with a high near 82. East southeast wind 5 to 10 mph.

RAP forecast

11 AM
300 - 600 fpm lift
3,000' - 6,000' top of lift
3,000' - 5,000' cloudbase
East southeast wind at 20 mph at 2,000'
East wind at 11 mph at 30'

2 PM
600 - 900 fpm lift
7,000' - 9,000' top of lift
5,000' - 6,000' cloudbase
East southeast wind at 11 mph at 2,000'
East southeast wind at 7 mph at 30'

5 PM
400 - 700 fpm lift
6,000' - 8,000' top of lift
6,000' - 7,000' cloudbase
East southeast wind at 13 mph at 2,000'

Op40 at 2 PM shows inversion at 6,300', cumulus clouds at 4,600', temperature profiles close, but plenty of dry air above the inversion, 51 degrees at 4,600', Southeast wind 7 - 11 mph, no cu-nimbs.

There is a bit more east in the wind than we would like for a stellar day, but it turns more southeasterly the further north that you go and later in the day. Looks like a good day to head up interstate 75 (you'll go west of it after Wildwood), but you'll want to stay as much to the east as you can at first making sure that you come over the intersection of the Turnpike and I75. Make an 8 km turnpoint around Dunnellon and just tag the east side to stay out of Ocala airspace. Stay west of I75 (to stay away from Payne's Prairie) for as far to the north as you like.

Task:
Launch when cumulus streets are lined up.
Open distance.

But the sky was covered with high clouds so a little later I wrote:

SkySight: https://skysight.io/secure/#

Has a great feature showing high cloud cover. Since we have that today it is a good idea to check it out.

SkySight shows total high cloud coverage until 2 PM and then it comes back after 3 PM.

Mid level cloud coverage to our east and northeast all day.

Low level (cumulus) clouds are present.

But at 10:30 the high clouds started breaking up from the west and soon it was clear. Later I wrote:

SkySight: https://skysight.io/secure/#

Showing 100% high cloud cover at 11:30:

The high cloud cover actually started breaking up from the west at 10:30.

Satellite at 11:15 AM:

You can see the cumulus development on the north eastern shore. Little to no high cloud cover over us all day.

The winds were light at Quest Air and showed light on the surface at Leesburg airfield, 11 AM through 2 PM. Given the light winds we were were experiencing we changed the task to out and return to Dean Still and 33rd intersection with the Sport Class only going as far at 474 and 33 (but still against a wind that had a south component). We also wanted to get back in time for Neal Harris' wake, from 3 PM to 6 PM.

The cu's started showing up even before the high clouds started dissipating to our west. The sky was chock full of them when I took off first at 21 after 1 PM. After a wait Greg Dinauer was next then a bunch of pilots before Mick Howard and John Simon. I waited around then headed south to get some lift after climbing to 4,400' at 320 fpm. I saw Greg at my altitude as he hung on longer to the tow after I released early in good lift. He wasn't waiting for the others and my radio was disconnected.

Further south I came in at 2,000' under Greg for 440 fpm and then 500 fpm for one turn a little further south to 5,000' before I had to keep from going into the cloud. The air was rock and roll and continued that way throughout the flight.

A sixteen kilometer glide through a blue hole across highway 474 into areas where you are not supposed to land had me down to 1,500' checking out a possible landing area not too far away near highway 33 and easy retrieval as I headed east upwind away from it looking under a cu for actual lift. I could feel that it was there somewhere. 420 fpm got me back to 4,000' as I watched the pine trees that I was over get smaller.

The wind was now 7 to 10 mph out of the east, so directly 90 degrees to the course line. Mick Howard joined me and we headed to the next thermal. I hadn't see Greg since the third thermal.

Mick and I climbed at 250 fpm 4 km from Dean Still and 33 to 4,600' then flew in lift toward the traffic circle. I hit the upwind side of the 400 meter cylinder while Mick went to the downwind side. I was now a bit ahead of him going back upwind. Apparently John Simons was right behind us.

Five kilometers north of the turnpoint I started working light lift when I spotted John just south of me. I didn't know if he had made the turnpoint yet or not. I assumed that he hadn't as he drifted south in the thermal going up and I headed north to find the next one. John got high and I had to work it again from 1,500' at the same spot as before.

I first passed over it at 2,400' heading for a cu to the north and felt a little bit of lift. When I found nothing but big sink in that direction I turned around and searched for it again. It was in the same place as when I was heading south at 230 fpm to 3,400'. I had lost Mick who went west downwind under the good looking cu's but got down to 700'.

There were nice looking cu's ahead so I pushed 4 km north. I could see Greg high above me. 240 fpm got me back to 4,500' over the glider port. We had seen plenty of sailplanes in the sky already and their competition also had a practice day today, mixed with the regular crowd.

From that altitude it is almost always possible to make it into goal at Sheets field with about 11 to 1. The wind was 10 mph out of the east southeast so that was a bit of a help. I took three turns 9 kilometers out and then made it back with 900' AGL.

John and Greg were there. Mick made it back a little later. I called a bad task for the sport class having them go to 474 and 33 against the east with with a south component. Got to do better during the Green Swamp Sport Klassic, which actually starts on Sunday.

Twenty four pilots and six mentors.

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2017 Quest Air Cross Country »

March 11, 2017, 10:41:19 pm EST

2017 Quest Air Cross Country

Twelve mph northeast wind

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog

I wasn't going to go flying as the day didn't look all that good. The forecast was for a moderately strong wind (12 mph) out of the northeast and perhaps no cumulus clouds. The clouds forecast is pretty tricky and often there are clouds even though the model at XCSkies doesn't call for them using either NAM or RAP data.

A cross wind task with that much wind is difficult and it requires a high top of lift or cloud base (we had that) and strong lift (that was certainly possible). But pilots were thinking that the day would get good with cumulus clouds later in the afternoon.

With Krzy Zryb here, as well as Greg Dinauer, John Simon, Larry and his brother Rob as was as a good number of other pilots I decided late to go flying as they came up with a task to the north toward where we could see cumulus clouds. With our crew that would take the task waiting around after all the king posted pilots launched and then landed again, it was easy for me to get ready in time to launch with the guys actually attempting the task.

I launched after John and just before Krzy. I had strong lift throughout the tow but waited until 1,500' given the strong wind. I worked 100 fpm drifting quickly to the southwest to 4,400'. My slow climb was not what others were seeing as they got up quickly and headed north.

There were cu's to our north mostly with a few over head and none to the south. I headed toward cu's to the north northwest and down to 1,800' worked 50 fpm then 180 fpm to 2,900', drifting quickly further away from the course line.

I headed back south but upwind to get to a better looking cu and finally found 350 fpm, like the other pilots were getting, to 4,200'. Larry later told me he was getting to 6,300'. I had come in under him when I found 50 fpm.

On the radio I could hear that progress was quite slow given the wind with pilots only at Grass Roots Airfield, not even half way to the first turnpoint at the intersection of the Florida Turnpike and highway 33. I raced toward the chicken coops north of Mascotte which sported a nice looking cu above them.

Down to 1,500' I worked 137 fpm drifting west again. Topping out at 2,600' I headed upwind only to repeat this little dance over the chickens but at 250 fpm to only 2,900'. I could see Greg a little higher and next to me going south so he had obviously given up on the task as he had just been at Grass Roots a little to the north. He turned into the wind just south of me as I also battled upwind to get to the next cu and hopefully make it back to Quest.

The cu didn't work out but I had my choice of many landing fields and picked the largest one closest to a paved road. As it is supposed to rain on Sunday I had to break down the glider anyway. Greg didn't make it back either.

No one completed the task. Larry who was working with his brother going downwind to the west made it back after his brother decked it near the Green Swamp.

No great shakes as a flying day, but we did fly and we flew with a goal in mind.

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2017 Quest Air Cross Country »

March 9, 2017, 8:35:58 pm EST

2017 Quest Air Cross Country

A classic day and we go around the Green Swamp

Davis Straub|Greg Dinauer|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|weather

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_17

https://airtribune.com/play/2244/2d

This was the forecast:

2017 Quest Cross Country, March 9th

National Weather Service forecast:

Patchy fog before 8am. Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 83. North wind around 5 mph.

NAM soaring forecast:

1PM
600-700 fpm lift
7,000' - 8,000' top of lift
5,000' - 6,000' cloudbase
West wind 3 mph at 2,000'
West wind 3 mph at 30'

4PM
300-400 fpm lift
7,000' - 8,000' top of lift
6,000' - 7,000' cloudbase
West northwest wind 6 mph at 2,000'
Convergence over Orlando

RAP forecast:

1 PM
300-600 fpm lift
5,000' - 7,000' top of lift
5,000' - 7,000' cloudbase
Southwest wind 4 mph at 2,000'
South southwest wind 3 mph at 30'
Best lift over the Green Swamp

4PM
300-400 fpm lift (None around the Green Swamp)
5,000' - 7,000' top of lift
5,000' - 7,000' cloudbase or no cu's
West northwest wind 5 mph at 2,000', 10 mph by Dade City

Task: Launch Noon, Start 12:15 PM

Quest, 3km
T7598, 7km
T98471, 1km
Quest, 400m
97.9km (optimized)

I ignored the RAP forecast for no lift at 4PM.

With a forecast for light winds, a high cloud base, and good lift we chose to go around the Green Swamp, this time counter clockwise. Quest Air was packed as it is on every day that the conditions look good. Four pilots were set to take up the big task, Larry Bunner, Patrick Halfhill, Greg Dinauer, and Davis Straub.

I towed up first at 11:34 AM (next week it will be 12:34 PM). Jim Prahl towed me to the south west after a turn around the field and let me off in light lift. I called out on the radio to the other three pilots my location and climb rate. Greg only heard my distance from the center of Sheets field and not what direction I was in. This would later lead him to try to find lift in the wrong place.

Jonny towed up Greg next but pulled him to the northeast while I was finding 300+ fpm 2.5 km to the southwest. I was a bit outraged at this given what happened to me the day before.

Jim Prahl towed Larry to me and we climbed up to cloud base. I headed out first while Larry worked more lift behind and I found even better lift. Soon I was a couple of kilometers west of Larry and working 500+ fpm to over 5,000'. We kept finding good consistent lift and kept getting high.

Getting up just on the east side of the Green Swamp I headed west southwest toward a cloud street 7 kilometers south of highway 50. This means I was heading into the teeth of the Green Swamp with little to no safe landing areas nearby. Larry chose to go to a single cu on a more northerly route and found 500+ fpm while I found little and had to keep going to the next set of cu's.

We only went over the Green Swamp because we had experienced good consistent lift and there were cu's over much of the territory that we wanted to cover, even if there weren't any landing areas.

I got to the little cloud street at 3,000', within glide of a possible landing area, and climbed at 500+ fpm to over 5,300'. I called out to Larry and he came over just above me as we got to cloud base.

We headed west northwest which put us back north of the course line but nearer to landable fields and still under developing cu's climbing to 5,400'. I called Larry to come back to join me in the thermal.

Larry suggested that I take the left course and he the right coming into the 7k turnpoint around Interstate 75 and highway 98. Again I ran into the lift and Larry came in under me. As was true in the previous flights, Larry and I were climbing at the same rate.

I headed to the southeast along the course line but Larry behind me headed south and I turned to join him in the next thermal. I guess he didn't want to go back over the Green Swamp again.

Larry was ahead and leading until we got to a cu five kilometers north of the turnpoint at the intersection of 98 and 471. Larry hadn't found the core when I got to him a bit higher but we finally found it and climbed at 400+ fpm to over 6,200'. I had to leave at cloudbase with Larry still climbing below me.

We took the T98471 turnpoint and then worked 500+ fpm just to its east. We worked a couple of 300 fpm thermals further east then I headed for the smoke from a small fire. It looked like the smoke was going straight up.

The smoke didn't work but the cu to the north which would have been the other target did. Larry got there first and found 800 fpm to 6,300'. I got there a few minutes later and took the same elevator ride to cloud base. We were now both on final glide, 20 km out from Quest Air.

Greg landed once and relaunched and flew near Patrick Halfhill, who had launched fourth. Greg hit hard sink over the Green Swamp and raced out to get over a landing field and did not get back up. Patrick made it around much later.

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The Wills Wing T2C All Carbon

March 1, 2017, 8:47:36 pm EST

The Wills Wing T2C All Carbon

Anecdotal evidence of superior performance

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Wills Wing

I get the privilege of flying a Wills Wing T2C 144 in exchange for advertising in the Oz Report. I've also done this exchange in the past numerous times with Moyes and Airborne. In February I received a new all carbon version of the T2C, the purple glider. I've now had a number of opportunities to fly it together with my flying buddies, Larry Bunner and Greg Dinauer.

Last year while flying with Larry, he was flying an all carbon T2C 144 and I was flying the version with aluminum inboards. Larry could consistently out climb and out glide me. Not by much, but enough to be noticeable. This year we are both flying all carbon versions and we are now closely matched. He was flying his glider from last year and just delivered it down to the Florida Ridge.

Larry received a new glider a couple of days ago but I haven't flown with him yet when he's flown that glider. We'll see how that goes.

Yesterday I flew 147 kilometers with Greg Dinauer. We purposefully flew together. He waited for me to climb up at Quest Air and I waited patiently for him thereafter.

Greg flies an all carbon Aeros Combat 136 with 20 pounds of ballast. Previously he would always out climb me and I mean every single time. He was not able to climb up to me yesterday after I joined him at cloud base over Quest Air. Even me doing that would not have been possible previously. Yes, if you wait at cloud base eventually the other pilot is going to get up near you, but previously Greg would always be a tad higher in the end.

Throughout the flight Greg had to chase me even though we hung together in almost every thermal. I could consistently out climb and out glide him.

Now it is a bit unfair of a comparison as Greg has a new sail with now about ten hours on it and he is not as happy with it as he was with his last sail that needed to be replaced. He was also happier with the previous version of the carbon leading edges, but they were replaced last year.

So, so far, I've really appreciated the outstanding performance and ease of flying of the new T2C 144 all carbon. Lands nice, too.

I'll have more opportunities to evaluate the T2C 144 and I'll report as I learn more.

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2017 Quest Air Cross Country »

February 28, 2017, 10:00:15 pm EST

2017 Quest Air Cross Country

We go big to the north

Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017

Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Sara Weaver

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Sara Weaver

Greg Dinauer|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Sara Weaver

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_13

Sara Weaver writes:

Today was my first day making a long goal.

My flight was 2.5 hours up to a maximum altitude of 5400. I tapped goal with 2500 feet of extra altitude, so I kept going to make my longest flight just a tiny bit longer, at about 65 km (will have to double check the distance).

This is by far the best way I could think of to end this month, and I'm so grateful to the amazing pilots who have been encouraging me along the way.

The sport class goal was Leeward, 64 km. This picture shows the land fill (Baseline Recycling Center) in the background just to the northwest of the goal. Later we told Sara to always go to that landfill as the bird flock there and it's always rough and tough.

With lighter south southeast winds than yesterday and a forecast for convergence up highway 301 to the north along the eastern side of the state we called an open distance task, while Sara called a goal at Leeward for the sport class.

Greg Dinauer and I were the only ones to head open distance and later in the flight we called Keystone Airfield, 147 km, as the goal. It was a nice place to land and there was no need to go any further.

I was off first at 12:19 with Greg right behind me. I pinned off early and had to fight to stay up getting down to 1,100' a couple of times before hooking it at 450 fpm to 4,000' up to Greg who was patiently waiting at cloudbase. Once up we were off together and flew together on purpose the whole way.

With a 8 to 20 mph south southeast tail wind we moved pretty quickly. South of the prisons I took a run to the next cloud street to the west which Greg disapproved of as there was a nice cloud just to our north. Down to 1,850' from 4,200' I found 100 fpm, which Greg joined me in.

We drifted quickly while climbing slowly until we were again low, me at 1,900' and Greg at 1,200' right smack dab over a baseball game inside one of the prisons. 30 fpm finally turned into 220 fpm and we climbed to 4,600'.

Our plan was to go north up 301 but the easterly component kept pushing us toward Interstate 75. Northwest of Wildwood as we again climbed up from low (me at 1,700') Greg suggested running to the northeast toward Leeward and when we got up we did just that to get over highway 301.

It was after 2PM so the day was getting much better. We stayed pretty high after that climbing up to 5,800'. We were able to ignore the patchwork of fields south of Citra and Hawthorne and just jump from well formed cu to the next one.

As we approached Keystone it looked like we had it made but there are few landing zones and plenty of lakes on the course line.  Greg wasn't sure that we could make it and didn't want to go under the nice cu's over one particularly large lake so headed for a fire to the northeast. Before we got there and down to 2,100' we found light lift at 200 fpm that was enough to make us feel comfortable about getting into the goal field.

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A sweet day in paradise

February 27, 2017, 9:59:48 pm EST

A sweet day in paradise

Going north with a stiff south southeast breeze

Belinda Boulter|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Rob Clarkson|Sara Weaver

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_12

Larry Bunner thought that we should go early so I took off first at 12:12 PM. Larry had a bit of help to extend so even though he wanted to get getting right away he was the fourth one to launch after Greg Dinauer and Rob Clarkson.

There was strong lift on tow and I was over 2000' just south of the runway. I held on a bit more given the strong south southeast wind to 2,350'. I know that strong winds can limit your options and I wanted to get let off further upwind of the field.

I didn't find the lift to the southeast and headed back getting quickly down below 1,800' before getting some light lift west of the field and drifting quickly away from it. The wind was 15 mph.

Greg called out 500 fpm over the field after pinning off at 1,200'. I was finally able to to get under him as he made cloud base and headed north. I climbed up to 3,800' and cloud base and headed downwind to the northwest.

Greg didn't find any more lift and landed. Rob decided it was too windy and landed back at Quest.

After my initial bout of light lift I was cautious heading north northwest toward the next cloud. I was definitely checking on each cloud and going to the nearest one assuming that there wouldn't be lift until I got under the next cloud. That held true throughout the flight.

The next thermal averaged over 300 fpm, but that didn't make me think that I could just glide to wherever and be assured that I would find strong lift. With a 19 to 20 mph south wind I knew it would be difficult to stay in the thermals.

The next thermal averaged a little over 100 fpm as I drifted southeast of the prisons south of the Florida Turnpike. I jumped to the west to get over a new housing development north of the prisons and down to below 1,800' worked dark cu's to climb to 4,200' at a little over 200 fpm.

I heard from Larry that he was back at Grass Roots airfield maybe 15 kilometers behind with Greg on the ground and Rob at Quest, so it was just the two of us and Belinda chasing.

Looking at the clouds ahead and thinking about the Ocala airspace I headed northwest again past the I75 and Turnpike intersection. I finally made it to some good looking clouds south of Marion Oaks but down to 1,250' I was getting broken lift down low. The thermals had been pleasant if often weak and quickly drifting. I stuck with this thermal given how low I was even at a little more than 150 fpm.

Larry got to over 4,000' at the Okahumpka service plaza on the Turnpike and was headed my way. As I got up and got over the southeast corner of Marion Oaks he was down to 2,000' just south of the area where I had been so low. I was looking hard to lift.

I climbed to 4,100' over Marion Oaks when Larry said that he was landing. Not wanting to drag him in the truck to the north I headed to a field about 12 km to the north and landed, so that we could get back in time to get ready for another good day on Tuesday.

John Simon and Sara Weaver launched just before I landed at about 2:15 PM. Sara went 24 km on her third cross country flight and second with John. John landed near where I did.

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Around the Green Swamp

February 3, 2017, 9:12:36 EST

Around the Green Swamp

Probably the earliest start ever

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|record|Rob Clarkson

With the Quest Air Cross Country in full swing, the boys went for the big one in light wind conditions, in this case clockwise around the Green Swamp, Florida's aquifer. Larry Bunner and Mick Howard were clever enough to get their track logs recorded on Airtribune. I don't know what Greg Dinauer's problem was. Rob Clarkson didn't know how to Check In.

Greg and Mick were able to make it around. Larry went down just short on the last leg. Rob turned back early when he didn't feel well. My glider isn't here yet.

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog__day_1

https://airtribune.com/play/2170/2d

Greg writes:

A 49 km task was set for us to go north to Hwy 33 and the Turnpike, back SE to Gator field and finally back to Quest. But the sky seemed so much more, and Larry Bunner and I looked at each other and I knew what he was thinking, but no, really? Around the green swamp?

So we set up a clockwise to 474-33 and SW to Famish field then the trek across the southern tip of the green swamp to hwy 98 and 471. Once on the other side, fly north up to 98 and I-75, then straight east across the northern part of the Swamp-if you dared- to Quest. We gave ourselves between one and five kms around some of the turn points so that we’d have options. After all no one has attempted the task this early in the year, so we tried to make it easy as possible to do. The Task length was 100 km

Larry was towed up first and wasted no time disappearing upwind, leaving us behind. The days are short and we all knew it, so no waiting around. Greg was next, Mick Howard and then Rob Clarkson. Rob aborted partway feeling sick. I caught quick glimpses of Larry ahead but lost him mostly, then, like a tide, I’d catch up with him again.

Mick, last of the three of us to launch, steadily maintained about 10-15 km back. It was almost mathematical. Eventually, we made it west across the bottom of the swamp and it was there that somehow I found myself ahead of Larry, being shocked to seem him climbing a mile behind me.

At the last turn point it was 4:00 pm and the climbs were clearly lighter. They were 5-600 fpm earlier down to 200 fpm. Larry’s radio was out the whole flight and I heard from Mick, who was about 10-12 km back, that Larry was very low and looked like he was going to land about 25 km short.

We lumbered on eastward in very light lift with the wind from the southwest and forest below. I was only getting up to 4200’, not the 5200 we were getting an hour earlier. I flew south up two different some streets off course just to stay up wind more, calling out the climbs the best I could to Mick. Eventually at 11 km out and 3900’ I dove in with plenty of altitude. Mick was over the field as I drove off to pick up Larry.

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2017 Quest Air Cross Country starts

Thu, Feb 2 2017, 7:55:33 am EST

February 1st was the first day

Facebook|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Rob Clarkson

Facebook|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Rob Clarkson

Facebook|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Rob Clarkson|Sara Weaver

Facebook|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Rob Clarkson|Sara Weaver

Facebook|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Quest Air Cross Country 2017|Rob Clarkson|Sara Weaver

The NAM forecast was right on with a light south breeze and top of lift on a blue day to between 4,000' and 5,000'. I set a task (even though my glider isn't here yet), of Quest, 474/33, and back. John Simon and Rob Clarkson made it. Larry Bunner and Mick Howard turned early to return as Larry had to go rent his house. Greg Dinauer is here also is Sara Weaver.

I forgot to put the task up on Airtribune, but will tomorrow.

https://airtribune.com/2017-quest-air-cross-country/blog

They are flying around the Green Swamp (where is my glider).

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Soaring at Quest Air

December 13, 2016, 7:12:53 pm EST

Soaring at Quest Air

Greg Dinauer gets ready to launch

Quest Air|weather

John Simon|Quest Air|weather

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|weather

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|weather

Around 1 PM Greg was ready to launch. Didn't stick the first time as he tried to help Sarah on her first cross country but after John Simon took off and stayed up, Greg took off. He and John made it to the Seminole Glider Port and back. Sarah on her second try did her first cross country flight.

Lots of cross country flying here at Quest in 80+ degree weather.

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Warm winter at Quest Air

December 12, 2016, 10:41:16 pm EST

Warm winter at Quest Air

Cu's fill the sky

Quest Air|weather

John Simon|Quest Air|weather

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|weather

Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Quest Air|weather

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat=28.558&lon=-81.8512#.WE9HN1yHOOZ

Monday around 1 PM. Click on the picture to get the high resolution version and check out the towing going on, like it was all day.

Greg Dinauer, John Simon, Rich Cizauskas, and numerous other pilots are here.

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Midwest 2017 »

December 6, 2016, 9:15:23 CST

Midwest 2017

Whitewater, Wisconsin, 04 - 10 Jun, 2017

Bruce Barmakian|Davis Straub|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|record|Wills Wing|Zac Majors

https://airtribune.com/midwest-2017/pilots

Pilots:

1 Krzysztof Grzyb (102) USA Questlift Inc. Litespeed RX 3.5
2 Larry Bunner (1) USA Dangerous Toys, WW T2C144
3 Greg Dinauer (103) USA n/a Combat 12.7 C
4 Linda Salamone (911)   USA Flytec T2C
5 Zac Majors (13) USA Wills Wing, Flytec T2C 154
6 Bruce Barmakian (813) USA   Laminar 13.2
7 Davis Straub (101) USA The Oz Report T2C
8 John Simon (1111) USA Quest Air Combat C 12.7
9 JD Guillemette (143) USA Sonora Wings Litespeed RX3.5

https://airtribune.com/midwest-2017/info/details__flying

Registration Open: December 10, 2016
Registration Closed: May 20, 2017
Pilot requirements: H3, AT, XC.

Twin Oaks Airport, Whitewater, Wisconsin, USA
N 42 51.350, W 88 45.487
821 ft ACL (250 m)
Cloud Base at this time of year will vary from 4K to 8K (max 10K in 2016)
HG Site Record: Triangle 159 miles, Open Distance 202 miles. (http://siterecords.blogspot.com/)
This airport is located on the North side of Whitewater city. It has 3 grass runways and 3 hangars. Whitewater is located around 100 miles NNW from Chicago.

Entry Fee:

1) $350.00 December 10, 2016 to February 28, 2017

2) $650 after February 28, 2017 to May 20, 2017

Tow Fee:
1) TBD ($300-$400)- depend on gas price / number of pilots.

Refund of Entry Fee:
Up to March 15, 2017 - 100% REFUND
March 16, 2017 to April 30, 2017 - 50% REFUND
After May 01, 2017 - NO REFUND

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Proposed Midwest Competition in Whitewater Wisconsin

September 7, 2016, 9:06:30 MST GMT-0600

Proposed Midwest Competition in Whitewater Wisconsin

Greg and Krzys are trying to determine your interest

Facebook|Greg Dinauer|Krzysztof "Krys/Kris" Grzyb

June 4th through 10th, 2017.

We have had two previous competitions there. You can contact them directly to say how interested you are on a scale of 1 (not interested) to 10 (definitely coming).

Greg Dinauer at https://www.facebook.com/greg.dinauer or Greg Dinauer <<gdinauer123>>;

Krzysztof Grzyb <<doitkg>>

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2016 Quest Air Open National Championships »

Wed, Apr 6 2016, 6:39:09 pm MDT

Parts 1 and 2

Bruce Barmakian|Greg Dinauer|James Stinnett|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Larry Bunner|Oleg Bondarchuk|Quest Air|Quest Air Open National Championships 2016|Robin Hamilton|Tullio Gervasoni|Yoko Isomoto|Zac Majors

Who's who is coming to the Quest Air Open.

Jonny Durand,
Zac Majors,
Yoko Isomoto,
Oleg Bondarchuk,
Olav Opsanger,
Robin Hamilton,
Tullio Gervasoni
Pedro Garcia,
Bruce Barmakian,
Larry Bunner,
Greg Dinauer
James Stinnett

Many of the top hang glider pilots in the world and in the US.

The slots are almost full. It is oversubscribed, but not all pilots are confirmed. First confirmed gets enrolled.

https://OzReport.com/2016QuestAirOpen.php

https://OzReport.com/2016QuestAirOpentwo.php

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2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic - day 1 »

April 4, 2016, 0:03:13 EST GMT-0400

2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic - day 1

A post frontal weak day

Andrey Solomykin|Belinda Boulter|Fausto Arcos|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Niki Longshore|Quest Air|Steve Kroop|Wills Wing

Andrey Solomykin|Belinda Boulter|Fausto Arcos|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Niki Longshore|Quest Air|Steve Kroop|Wills Wing

Andrey Solomykin|Belinda Boulter|Fausto Arcos|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Niki Longshore|Quest Air|Steve Kroop|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Andrey Solomykin|Belinda Boulter|competition|Fausto Arcos|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Niki Longshore|Quest Air|Steve Kroop|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Andrey Solomykin|Belinda Boulter|competition|Fausto Arcos|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Mark Bourbonnais|Niki Longshore|Quest Air|Steve Kroop|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

A front came through on Saturday with rain and high winds. The winds were still a bit strong on Sunday morning, but the forecast was for the winds dying down substantially in the afternoon.

Belinda takes a photo that shows that the winds are much lighter.

NAM was showing top of lift at 3,000' - 4,000' at 2PM on XCSkies. 4,000' - 5,000' at 5 PM. Not real high. Of course, with a post frontal north wind there was a forecast for no cu's. While the lift was predicted to be 600-700 fpm, it did not look like it would be that strong with temperatures much lower than before the front now in the upper seventies.

The task committee called a short opening task to the south and southwest. The nominal distance for the Sport Class here is 30 km in light April conditions and the task distance was a little over that. They put a 9KM radius around the goal point it get us near good landing fields and easy retrieval at Dean Still road.

The task was to fly south along highway 33 to the intersection of 474 and 33 then head off the south east corner of the Green Swamp over open fields toward the intersection of Rockridge and highway 98. A little tricky heading south on 33 with kingposted gliders as the fields are there but you have to be choosey. It is not totally open like it is to the north and northwest of Quest.

There are four mentors in the competition, Larry Bunner, Greg Dinauer, Ton Lanning and myself. Our payment consists of free tows. We spend considerable time with our teams and switch every two days.

Steve Kroop from Flytec USA came on Saturday night to help pilots understand their instruments. He and the mentors split up the pilots into instrument groups and a two to three hour discussion ensued. Thanks to Steve for all his expertise and kind help.

Because of the wind forecast for reduced winds later in the afternoon the task committee called on us to open the launch at 2:30 PM. The task was "elapsed time" so your time started when you crossed the 5 KM start cylinder. This is how we run Sport Class competitions, without start gates.

Since we had five pilots flying Wills Wing T2C's I decided to score them separately than the king posted gliders. Normally we would just provide a substantial handicap to the topless gliders but with so many I determined that it would be fairer just to score them separately even though everyone flew the same task. This is still a sport class competition, with two separate groups being scored.

The king posted hang gliders were handicapped, actually anti-handicapped, with the Wills Wing U2 and similar configured gliders having no handicap, and gliders equivalent to the Sport 2 with a 6% bonus. The Wills Wing Eagle pilot got a 29% bonus.

We divided the pilots into teams of five with a couple of extras in the S (Sport 2) team. The T (T2C) team launched first in the hope that they could stay up on a weak day and show the rest of us the lift. The two U teams were next and finally the S team. Each mentor launched just in front of their team, again hopefully they would radio to their team members where the lift was.

Getting ready to launch in team order. Photo by Belinda.

I found lift that averaged 105 fpm on the southwest corner of the Quest Air field and radioed my position and climb rate to my team members. Hard to know who heard as they basically listen. At 105 fpm conditions were not really great and I was not climbing that high. There were plenty of pilots nearby so markers were the order of the day.

I hung around in the 5KM start cylinder for 35 minutes attempting to gather up the team and then move them south toward the first turnpoint. One of the team headed further south when I went back north to gather more. I really could not tell where most of the team was.

Finally moving further south there were a few markers ahead so I encouraged my pilots to go on the course and use the markers ahead to show them the lift. I had been able to climb to 3,900' before heading south and that was the highest I was to get all day.

The ground was flooded below us from the heavy rains on Saturday and days before. The lift was weak and we just weren't getting high, but it was fun. We found lift pretty readily but it was rarely coherent. We'd hit a little here and a little bit there. One of my pilots ahead of me and a couple behind.

The markers ahead showed me the lift at the Seminole Glider Port and I waited there for the two pilots just behind me to catch up. Mick Howard, Greg Dinauer, Larry Bunner, (so two mentors and a topless) were waiting around with me. Andre Solomykin, from Russia, flying a nice looking Aeros Discus, was there also.

One of my pilots was too low just behind me and couldn't make it to our lift and landed. As we headed south another pilot was on the north side of the glider port getting up, so I told him that there were markers ahead not far and not flying fast, so get up and use us to get to the next thermal.

That thermal a few kilometers south of the glider port was the best of the day at 300 fpm. Andre got above me there and Greg and Mick were high.

Heading further south west now that we had tagged the waypoint, I came in under these guys again and found lift that averaged 65 fpm. I was calling out my position and lift values ahead so I think one of my pilots came in under me, but was too low and landed.

Larry Bunner, who was supposed to be transmitting on his team frequency, was in fact transmitting on ours and not communicating with his team mates at all. But we appreciated all the extra help. He had already gone back again to help Kelly Myrkle, but again could not communicate with him.

Finally I had to leave the weak lift low at 1,700' and just head out toward the goal looking at massively flooded fields ahead. It seemed to me that I would never find lift over such fields and that I was on final glide to the edge of the goal cylinder with no team pilots in tow. A complete failure in the mentoring business.

But it was just one kilometer and I found 200+ fpm at 1,400'. The wind was only 4 mph out of the north northwest and I climbed 1000'  in the much welcomed lift before some black vultures came through heading north further into the Green Swamp. I decided to follow them away from the goal and see if they could find something even better. They were definitely following a lift line and I kept hitting little bits, but didn't gain any altitude as I kept watching them hoping for them to start turning.

After this game for one kilometer, I turned around and lost all by 400' of what I had gained and again headed out over the flooded plains. The sink wasn't that bad and it looked like I could just glide to the edge of the goal cylinder. Down to less than 1000' AGL a little over 3 km from goal, I found some sweet little lift that was actually very coherent. 109 fpm.

It was over a nice open field with a paved road nearby and there was no reason to leave it, just hang in there and maybe get to the center of the goal cylinder. Lots of birds came over the play so this must have been the best lift in the neighborhood.

It was easy to make to the goal cylinder with 1,800' of altitude and once there I spotted Andre and Mick at the north end of a long field. I figured that I might as well land there on the south side of Dean Still road. Turned out that the field was soaked and the water was full of cow poop. We all smelled awful.

All the mentors landed in or next to this field so it was an easy retrieval.

Kingposted results:

https://airtribune.com/gssk2016/results/task1297/day/sport-class

# Name   Nat Glider Time Distance Total
1 Andrey Solomykin M RUS Aeros Discus 00:59:42 34.24 433
2 Nick Jones M CAN Wills wing U2 145   26.70 311
3 Kelly Myrkle M USA Aeros Discus   20.10 266
4 Niki Longshore F USA Icaro 2000 Orbiter   17.35 261
5 Richard Elder M USA Bautek Fizz   17.23 246
6 John Maloney M USA WW Sport 2 155   15.60 242
7 John Blank M USA WW Sport 2 175   12.53 204
8 Richard Westmoreland M USA Wills wing Eagle 164   8.91 192
9 Greg Sessa M USA Wills Wing U2 160   11.84 184
10 Owen MB M CAN Wills Wing U2   9.23 153

 Topless results:

# Name Nat Glider Time Distance Total
1 Fausto Arcos ECU Willswing T2C 154 01:03:11 34.24 897
2 Mick Howard USA WillsWing T2C 144 01:06:00 34.24 828
3 Mark Bourbonnais CAN Wills Wing 136 T2C 01:19:56 34.24 668
4 Alan Arcos ECU Wills Wing T2C 144   26.11 309
5 Ken Kinzie CAN Wills Wing T2C 144   5.71 93

The mentors score by getting their pilots to goal. We'll get the topless scores up on Airtribune in the morning.

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Quest Air Cross Country

March 24, 2016, 6:24:47 pm EST GMT-0400

Quest Air Cross Country

Larry goes well into Georgia

Belinda Boulter|Greg Dinauer|PG|Quest Air

https://airtribune.com/questxc/blog__day_9

Our XCSkies forecast southeast winds at 10 mph at 2,000' at 2 PM rotating to south southwest north near Jessup, Georgia. Strong lift, a top of lift at 5,000' to 7,000' but no cu's. Actually whenever there is a southeast wind we have cu's so we felt that it would be true on Wednesday also.

Ken was off first and then we had a little wait while the tug got some more gas. I was next at 11:50 AM and found plenty of drift in moderate to weak lift as I waited for Larry to get towed up and then climb up to me. Once together we headed off to the northwest downwind toward the Okahumpka service plaza on the Florida Turnpike. There were indeed cu's and we jumped from one to the next.

The winds were 17 mph out of the southeast but there were no cloud streets unlike our previous flight and the cu's that were out were very thin but conveniently spaced.

An hour after I launched we were climbing at the intersection of the Turnpike and Interstate 75. We had passed Ken and were deciding whether to head north up state highway 301 or follow along west of Interstate 75. Our climb was to the north northwest and Larry and I agreed to head north as the east wind component was pretty weak. The wind was 13 mph out of the south southeast.

The lift was weak, broken and turbulent. I would hit 600 fpm then 200 fpm or find the edge of the thermal and be in sink. Most climbs lasted less than 500' but we were for the most part over 4,000' so we were near cloud base at a little over 5,000'. We did get down to 2,500' over the intersection of highway 301 and highway 27 next to Bellevue. Traffic was tied up as apparently there were incidents on 75 and all the trucks were sent over to 301. We climbed out at 350 fpm for the best average so far to 5,000'.

We stayed high and headed north up the slot between the Ocala National Forest to the east and Ocala to the west. Ken was way off to our west and south. Greg Dinauer and Cory Barnwell were behind us and following us up 301. It actually goes off to our west north of Bellevue and we headed straight north to meet up with it again at Orange Lake.

It had looked at first as though the cu's were going to disappear after we passed Wildwood, but they would form just in front of us and we would head for them to find 200 to 300 fpm on average. Again the pattern was for 500' to 1,000' climbs from now 4,500'. The cu's were broken and turbulent, this didn't change. We rarely found a solid core.

East of Greystone airfield we headed north northwest to cu's just east of Orange Lake and south of Lake Lochloosa. I stayed in the 300+ fpm to climb to 5,700'. Larry left the lift early and I passed him heading for the cu's to the northeast. I found 400 fpm at 3,000' and Larry saw me and came my way finding 600 fpm before he got to me south of Hawthorne. I heard from him on the radio (we were in constant contact) and headed over to him just as it quit. I would have to catch up with him in a couple of thermals.

We followed along east of highway 301 and found strong lift 400 - 500 fpm to 5,900'. I found 700 fpm just below him when he was climbing at 400 fpm so that got us back together.

We headed north back to 301 and to the south west of Starke, again to the cu's. We could see the prison off to the northwest as about the only open land to the west of 301. Our course line took us away from 301 just to be sure that we didn't get into Jacksonville airspace.

This was perhaps a bit overblown concern. The airspace creeps a little west of 301 further north but we could have easily avoided it by staying 2 to 3 km west of 301 as we headed northeast toward Jacksonville. We just were not too sure where we should head. We could see the airspace on our 6030's.

Northwest of Starke we came up upon the Lake Butler Wildlife Management area. To our east there was smoke coming off a fire and marking the convergence zone. If we hadn't been overly concerned about airspace (and I am to blame for that) we would have headed east back to 301 and flown right in the convergence zone, in the smoke.

Years ago I had flown up here and seen this same convergence zone marked by smoke. The top of cloud base was much higher then, maybe 7,000' to 8,000' and the line much more definite then. But I still recognized the line and also felt the turbulence that is associated with not being in the lift.

I looked ahead as we climbed to 5,700'. All I could see were trees and clear cut areas to the east of the Wildlife Management area. I lead out but over the trees at 4,000' I could not see any cultivated fields, and flying barefoot I didn't want to risk landing in clear cut areas. I had done that before and although I didn't have a problem, I didn't want to risk it. Again, right then we should have headed east.

There were no cu's ahead. We had out run them. It looked like we might run out of lift also.

Larry caught 150 fpm behind me and I went back to him but didn't get it. I headed back south to get over cultivated field and found lift at 2,000' with a hawk and a bald eagle, with cu's overhead. Climbing back up I was thinking about heading east to get close to the highway and get closer to the convergence.

After getting up I decided that I had had enough of the broken lift and looked for a nice long north south field to land in.

Larry climbed up slowly to my north and west to 5,700' and headed north toward the Okefenokee Swamp. Our next waypoint to give us general guidance on this task was St. George on the southeast side of the swamp.

He found a thermal over a non landable area near the official border of the Management area with a big landable field back to the south. He was able to climb up and get up to Folkston our next waypoint.

It was getting late, after 6 PM and I was in the car with Belinda. Cory was down just north of his old home town of Starke. Ken would soon be down near where I landed after heading south. Greg was soon to be down on 301 just north of Callahan.

Larry was on glide from Folkston and moving landing field to landing field interspersed among the trees. Finally he found a large one just south of Nahunta, east of Waycross.

We got home at 1 AM.

http://www.onlinecontest.org/olc-2.0/para/flightinfo.html?flightId=-1445090882

http://www.onlinecontest.org/olc-2.0/para/getScoring.html?scoringId=319

http://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/1351690

http://wxc.fai.org/module.php?id=22&l=en&date=20160324&contest=INT&gliderclass=hg1

http://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/23.3.2016/15:48

http://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-open/

Ken at 108 miles. Don picked him and Cory up:

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Quest Air Cross Country

March 22, 2016, 7:27:45 pm EST GMT-0400

Quest Air Cross Country

Capped in the blue

Ken Kinzie|Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Quest Air

Greg Dinauer|Ken Kinzie|Quest Air

https://airtribune.com/questxc/blog__day_8

Big plans, but we didn't get very far. I was off first and the lift was weak and chopped up. Not all that pleasant. Greg Dinauer, Cory Barnwell, and Ken Kinzie came next. We all climbed slowly and we weren't getting that high. I pushed east into the seven mph wind to find another lift line. As I pushed further south to find weak lift everyone else landed. Larry hadn't taken off yet.

I hung in the lift as it improved and waited for Larry to launch as I climbed to 3,700'. Cory decided to relaunch and it wasn't long before Larry and he were working the thermal below me as we drifted west. We went back and forth in 50 fpm lift not getting to 4,000'.

Our stated task was to go counterclockwise around the Green Swamp but given the conditions and the obvious inversion it sure didn't look like we were going any where. Since Cory had landed he wasn't showing up anymore on Airtribune (that's  switch I can change). We don't know why Larry wasn't showing up.

We agreed that we weren't doing the task as we hung around a few kilometers west of Quest so I headed back to land. Larry was ready to land also but caught a good thermal and decided with Cory to do a little triangle to the north.

Conditions had improved and when I didn't want any lift I found it hard to find sink. The whole field was lifting off and I had to go away to find a sink hole. Even with the field lifting off, it was not a problem when I got below 500' to get into the field and land in the light east wind.

Cory and Larry took their little task to the north and then went out again to help John Maloney on a Sport 2 fly an out and return. He wasn't able to make it back.

Looks like we will have a good day tomorrow going far to the north again.

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Quest Air Cross Country

March 4, 2016, 7:37:25 EST

Quest Air Cross Country

Last Monday and Tuesday

Belinda Boulter|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Quest Air

Belinda Boulter|John Simon|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Quest Air

Belinda Boulter|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Quest Air

Belinda Boulter|Greg Dinauer|John Simon|Ken Kinzie|Larry Bunner|Quest Air

https://airtribune.com/questxc/blog__day_4

We've got an ongoing cross country non-competition going here at Quest Air. With Larry Bunner, John Simon, Ken Kinzie, Cory Barnwell, Greg Dinauer and me. Looks like good days ahead.

I set a task but it is usually changed at the last minute depending on the conditions and I don't have time to go back and change it on Airtribune. Any task will do, allowing us to start tracking and for our tracks to be displayed on the Airtribune web site.

On Tuesday Larry's phone turned off. Ken's phone stopped. Greg wasn't and hasn't yet signed up. I was the only one to be tracked and Belinda kept Sue Bummer who was on retrieve updated by SMS.

A few minutes into the flight my 6030 screen froze, but the 6030 still beeped. I had also forgotten to hook up my headset to the radio. I was first to launch (in a bit of a hurry I guess) and I just waited for Greg and Larry to get up to me before we headed off.

The wind was out of the south and there were good cu's and it was easy to get to 4,800' not quite cloud base. Greg headed out first but he headed north toward the better looking clouds without taking into consideration the southwest wind which would take us over a swamp and on edge of the west side of the Leesberg airspace.

After climbing with Larry and Greg I headed northwest to Grass Roots to get under some cu's and stay further west and away from Leesburg. Unfortunately Larry and Greg didn't follow me and so I was on my own for the rest of the flight.

The going was slow with broken weak lift until I found 300 fpm to 5,300' just on the southeast end of the Villages north of the Turnpike. Turns out Larry and Greg were over me about a thousand feet higher when they saw me circling.

I kept heading north northwest cross wind to get over to highway 301 and the path west of the Ocala National Forest. Seems like I passed Greg and Larry up just before Silver Springs without seeing them.

North of the Leeward airfield there is a long area of trees and a few tight landing areas, but I was staying above 3,000' so it wasn't an issue. Greg had landed south of Ocala.

With open fields east of the Keystone airfield I was working lift from 2,000' and drifting over swamp lands. I kept going cross wind after each climb. Down to 1,400' over some large dry looking fields I climbed out at 200 fpm as I contemplated the lakes ahead and continued to see a path back toward 301 as I drifted over more swamp.

North of Citra I came over a large area of mostly blue berry farms, but with some open fields. Hawthorne was just ahead but there were few landing areas to the north and I was down to 2,000' and not finding any lift at almost 4PM. The fields with the blue berries did not look that inviting so I landed with the cows instead. They were curious, even the bull.

Larry landed about the same time fourteen kilometers back to the south.

The land owners were quite pleasant even though I scared the women home alone with four kids (two neighbors). When her husband got home we drove out to the back 40 and loaded up my glider and then arrived back at the house just as Sue Bunner showed up in my truck.

First cross country flight to the north this Spring. Ken Kinzie landed to the south east just on the other side of all the swamps.

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2016 Quest Air Open National Championships (both parts) »

Tue, Feb 23 2016, 7:47:23 am EST

Top pilots are coming to Florida

Chris Zimmerman|CIVL|Davis Straub|Greg Dinauer|James Stinnett|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon Durand Jnr|Larry Bunner|Oleg Bondarchuk|Patrick Kruse|Quest Air|Quest Air Open National Championships 2016|Robin Hamilton|Yoko Isomoto|Zac Majors

Fifty one pilots have signed up for the Quest Air Open National Championships. There are only sixty slots available. If you want to come to the competition it would be best to register now, fill out the waivers and pay for your spot as that determines who gets to come.

https://OzReport.com/2016QuestAirOpen.php

Five women pilots are entered, the most in quite a while.

Seven sport class pilots and four ATOS pilots (again the most in quite a while).

Most of these top pilots are also coming in the Quest Air Open (part 2):
https://OzReport.com/2016QuestAirOpentwo.php
https://airtribune.com/qao22016/pilots

Twenty five pilots have already signed up for this high level competition.

Discuss "2016 Quest Air Open National Championships (both parts)" at the Oz Report forum   link»  

2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

February 18, 2016, 9:18:26 EST

2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

Larry Bunner and Greg Dinauer and I will be mentoring Sport Class pilots

CIVL|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Jeffrey "Jeff" Lawrence Bohl|Larry Bunner|Quest Air|Russell Brown|USHPA

This is the only Sport Class only competition in the US and is sanctioned by the USHPA for the National Championship series and by CIVL for Sport Class World ranking. You can earn the right to be the US Sport Class National Champion and ranked number 1 in the World. You gotta start somewhere.

http://civlrankings.fai.org/?a=326&ladder_id=9&

Currently Jeff Bohl and Cory Barnwell, USA pilots, are ranked 1 and 2 in the world.

And the US is ranked number 1: http://civlrankings.fai.org/?a=328&ladder_id=9&ranking_date=2016-02-01&

Go to register here: http://ozreport.com/2016GreenSwampSportKlassic.php

Quest Air is preparing heavily for the upcoming competition season with six Dragonflies maintained on site by Russell Brown. A huge launch area in any direction, plenty of mellow Florida air, great camping spots in our park/forest.

Register soon to keep your costs low. At a mere $300 for aerotowing and now $225 for registration this is the lowest cost tow competition in the US.

Get ready to sharpen your cross country, racing, and competition skills with the help of experienced high level competition pilots.

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2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic »

February 6, 2016, 3:14:16 pm EST

2016 Green Swamp Sport Klassic

The registration fee increases next Friday

Davis Straub|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Jamie Shelden|Larry Bunner

Davis Straub|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Larry Bunner

Davis Straub|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2016|Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Larry Bunner

http://ozreport.com/2016GreenSwampSportKlassic.php

We have three mentors for the competition. Davis Straub, Larry Bunner, and Greg Dinauer.

Sign up soon and get all your paper work in and fees paid to keep your registration costs down. Aerotow fees are only $300, less than Jamie's Santa Cruz Flats Race, for example. Quite a bit less than the aerotow fees in Big Spring. It makes sense to fly competitions at flight parks.

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The season is on at Quest Air

February 1, 2016, 10:23:57 pm EST

The season is on at Quest Air

Larry Bunner and Greg Dinauer are here

Greg Dinauer|Larry Bunner|Quest Air

Pilots have been flying in January here at Quest and they have had some good days, but today was the first cross country with Larry Bunner going to the Turnpike and back.

The high was 80 which takes us back to December. Larry was off just before me and Greg was next. Larry and I were up at 3,500' as I waited for Greg. Greg was climbing slowly and without the radios working (this was our first together flight of the season) Larry headed out on the task and we lost touch with him as I waited.

Greg got up but lost it south of Quest and I go to work light lift around Quest getting low and getting back up. Larry was able to go out on his own while Greg landed. The sky was full of cu's and while there was plenty of shadows that made for interesting slow climbs.

After a long flight I decided to land and it wasn't that much longer that Larry made it back. A sweet day all around with lots of pilots having a great time.

Larry writes:

Cloudbase was low all day (<4000') but the clouds were very reliable. I managed to hit base seven times and slogged my way around the course having to deviate from the shortest path based on available clouds. Fun first day in Florida! Ended up with about 35 miles and 2:37 and a couple climbs in the 450fpm range. Hopefully tomorrow is even better.

http://ozreport.com/data/2-1-16Bunner.igc

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2015 Santa Cruz Flats Race - day 2 »

September 14, 2015, 9:26:25 pm MST

2015 Santa Cruz Flats Race - day 2

Iffy at launch and then a blue hole

Jamie Shelden|Kraig Coomber|Larry Bunner|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2015

Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Kraig Coomber|Larry Bunner|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2015

Greg Dinauer|Jamie Shelden|Kraig Coomber|Larry Bunner|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2015

http://santacruzflatsrace.blogspot.com/2015/09/day-2.html

Photo by Jamie Shelden.

https://airtribune.com/2015scfr/blog__day_2

Setting a task proved to be quite difficult with a forecast of southwest winds at 17 knots up near cloud base at 8,000'.

Then at launch the Swift and Super floater pilots didn't get ready in time and that stacked up every one behind them. In addition there was a little squall to the south with some virga and there were other threatening clouds nearby. There was a little spit of rain and the launch kept being suspended. The winds at launch were very light and there was no sign of the forecasted higher winds up above.

Launching continued to be slow. Only the open class pilots in the ordered launch were ready and prepared to launch. Everyone else was taking their own sweet time.

Pedro was the first pilot in the early bird window which cause a bit of controversy because pilots thought that pilots in the top ten (and Pedro was in first) couldn't launch in early bird (besides all the early bird launch time had been eaten up by the Swifts, etc.)

With time running out for pilots to get the first launch time the order launch started moving just as Mitch broke a prop on one of the two trikes clipping a bush on launch.

Finally we got going, but by the time I launched Larry Bunner, who was in early bird, was getting the first start clock. Fortunately I quickly found strong lift at 400 fpm and climbed with Dangerous Dave Gibson to 8,000'. We raced to the edge of the 10 KM start cylinder for the third start a half hour after I launched and were only a few minutes behind the window opening.

At 90 to 100 km/h we raced to the cu's near the hills northeast of Casa Grande. The winds were 11 to 12 mph out of the southwest, much lighter than forecast. There were wispies near the mountain and fuller clouds further south of the course line. Dave behind me headed further south as I went for the wispies, hoping that they were growing. Dave found good lift.

The wispies were working and I found 200 fpm then 250 fpm near the optimized turnpoint of the 24 km radius point. The wind was down to 7 mph now out of the west northwest heading back toward the next turnpoint at the Sarita airfield. It was a big blue hole ahead.

There were wispies at the edge of the blue hole further south and I headed for them from 4,800'. But even though I kept going from wispies to wispies, I found no lift. Soon I had to land just west of the Sarita airfield. Apparently Dave landed nearby.

Other pilots who started earlier were north of us in weak lift having not ventured toward the turnpoint.

No results yet. Heard that Olav Opsanger was 1.5 km for goal. No one at goal. Kraig Coomber about 5 km from goal.

Jim Weitman, Greg Dinauer, David Straub. Photo by Starr.

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2015 Santa Cruz Flats Race - day 1 »

Mon, Sep 14 2015, 8:57:00 am MDT

Results

Øyvind Ellefsen|David Gibson|Davis Straub|Dustin Martin|Filippo Oppici|Gerry Pesavento|Greg Dinauer|Greg Kendall|Jeffrey "Jeff" Lawrence Bohl|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Jon "Jonny" Durand jnr|Kraig Coomber|Moyes Litespeed RX|Patrick Kruse|Paul Voight|Ryan Voight|Santa Cruz Flats Race 2015|Steven Pearson|Tyler Borradaile|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C|Zac Majors

There is a glitch on the Airtribune server, so the results aren't on-line yet.

Class 1:

# Name Glider Time Total
1 Pedro Garcia Wills Wing T2C 154 01:35:40 1000
2 Zac Majors Wills Wing T2C 144 01:40:55 911
3 Filippo Oppici Wills Wing T2C 144 01:41:09 900
4 Olav Opsanger Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 01:41:36 891
5 Kraig Coomber Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 01:42:26 873
6 Tony Armstrong Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 01:42:37 864
7 Dustin Martin Wills Wing T2C 144 01:42:34 860
8 Josh Woods Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 01:43:30 855
9 Jonny Durand Moyes Litespeed Rs 3.5 01:44:48 840
10 Oyvind Ellefsen Moyes Litespeed Rs 4 01:43:44 837
11 Ryan Voight Wills Wing T2C 144 (2011) 01:44:56 832
12 Tyler Borradaile Wills Wing T2C 01:47:37 803
13 Wolfgang Siess Wills Wing T2C 154 01:47:40 799
14 David Gibson Wills Wing T2C 144 01:48:37 795
15 Kenneth Andrews Wills Wing T2C 144 01:53:11 755
16 Jd Guillemette Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 01:56:48 729
17 Patrick Pannese Wills Wing T2C 154 01:58:52 718
18 Patrick Kruse Wills Wing T2C 144 01:56:33 717
19 Davis Straub Wills Wing T2C 144 01:57:48 712
20 Greg Dinauer Aeros Combat 12.7 C 02:01:42 699
21 Grant Emary Wills Wing T2C 02:07:05 668
22 Greg Kendall Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 02:05:40 649
23 Gerry Pesavento Wills Wing T2C 144 02:07:52 646
24 Jeffery Bohl Wills Wing T2C 144 02:07:16 645
25 Steven Pearson Wills Wing T2C 144 02:21:54 587
26 Jim Weitman Will Wing T2C 144 430
27 Cory Barnwell Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 394
28 Robert Degroot Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 388
29 Jay Devorak Moyes Litespeed RX 3.5 344
30 Alfredo Grey Wills Wing T2C 329
31 Michael Williams Wills Wing Sport 2 152
32 Mike Jefferson Wills Wing T2 144 21

Scoring issues with Sport class, no Class 4 reports yet, ATOS class not fully reported, some missing from open class.

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2015 East Coast Championship

Sat, Jun 6 2015, 9:04:20 pm EDT

Day 7

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing

Blue Sky|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Blue Sky|Bruce Barmakian|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Blue Sky|Bruce Barmakian|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Blue Sky|Bruce Barmakian|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Blue Sky|Bruce Barmakian|competition|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

Blue Sky|Bruce Barmakian|competition|Davis Straub|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|John Simon|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

The forecast was for thunderstorms. Light north winds on the ground up to 15 mph at 2,000'. We set up near the camping area then move down to the north/south grass runway to actually tow into the wind.

The task is 55 kilometers to the south with a turn point 29 kilometers to the south to keep us away from Easton airspace. The sky is almost completely full of cu's many of them towering. Plenty of sunlit spots also, and blue sky. With rain just to our north, we suspend the launch. Half an hour later it has gone by us and launch is open again in the sunlight with a cloud street just to our west.

I take off followed by Bruce and Pete. There is lift under the cloud street and I climb to 3,000' Bruce glides south just in front of me. Pete had a weaklink break at 1,400' and is circling up below me as I head out down the cloud street at cloud base.

Since I have been seeing towering cu's around I stick close to the edge of the street just in case I need to run to get away from cloud suck. The street takes me off at an angle to the south southwest while the course line is due south.

At nine km out from the start the rain under the cloud street begins, not that far from where the cloud street ends. I race to the south southeast to get away from the rain, away from the cloud, but this takes three or four kilometers out into the blue. There is a line of cu-nimbs to the east sucking up all the clouds in that direction.

I head south southeast toward the course line but I'm not finding any lift. I have to turn just before the Tuckahoe river as I'm down to 350' and land in a corn field with corn quite low a little over 16 km from the start.

Later Pete goes down the same cloud street and circles up in the rain. He is able to get to cloud base in the rain and then glide to the south southeast to land near the turnpoint at Magfarm, at 29 km out. Bruce lands between us.

The task is stopped at 2:15 PM, forty five minutes after the start gate opened so the task is cancelled. The sport task also (which was to MagFarm).

Open class results:

https://airtribune.com/ecc2015/results/task3/comp/class-1

# Name Glider Total
1 Oleg Bondarchuk Aeros Combat 12.7 C 1465
2 Mitch Shipley Ww T2C 144 1253
3 Rich Cizauskas Aeros Combat 1246
4 Pete Lehmann Wills Wing T2-154 1158
5 Jd Guillemette Moyes Litespeed S4 1079
6 Greg Dinauer Aeros Combat 12.7 887
7 John Simon Aeros Combat L 15 806
8 Bruce Barmakian Wills Wing T2C 136 803
9 Felix Cantesanu Aeros Combat C 778
10 Davis Straub Wills Wing T2C 144 751

Sport Class results:

https://airtribune.com/ecc2015/results/task3/comp/class-1-sport

1 Knut Ryerson Aeros Discus 1037
2 John Dullahan Wills Wing Sport 2 972
3 John Maloney Ww Sport 2 857
4 Nick Caci Ww Sport 2 155 805
5 Soraya Rios Wills Wing Sport 2 135 766
6 Jeff Curtis Ww Sport 2 135 720
7 Hugh Mcelrath Wills Wing Sport 2 155 524
8 Richard Elder Bautek Fizz 497
9 Greg Sessa Wills Wing U2 483
10 Brian Boudreau Wills Wing Sport 2 155 292

Only two days out of seven that we had actual real tasks, but four days of attempted tasks. The flying was lovely here as always. Even with all the cu-nimb activity the air was for the most part very pleasant. We didn't land in wheat fields (they can be a lot higher than you think. Plenty of corn and soy bean fields to land in. As well as airports at goal. Last year we flew seven out of seven days.

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2015 East Coast Championship

Mon, Jun 1 2015, 8:53:00 pm EDT

Day 2

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|competition|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Belinda Boulter|competition|East Coast Championships 2015|Greg Dinauer|Highland Aerosports|Jeff Curtis|Lawrence "Pete" Lehmann|Mitchell "Mitch" Shipley|Mitch Shipley|Oleg Bondarchuk|Pete Lehmann|Tom Lanning|Wills Wing

Amazingly enough given the forecast for a 70% chance of rain, we had a valid task. With the last forecast telling us that the rain would pass us to the north, the task committee chose an out and return task to the east with a strong west southwest wind. The sport guys just have to go out.

The launch opened at 12:30 PM with the sky full of cu's, but I waited around with Pete Lehmann and Tom Lanning until 12:44 to launch. The lift was light but it was easy to get to the cloudbase at 3,400'. Then it was easy to go from cloud to cloud and stay at cloud base near the edge of the 5 km start cylinder.

The only problem was at cloud base one can't see much of what is going on out on the course line. I mean we were right there at the edge of the clouds with wispies all around.

At 1:29:24 I lead out to get inside the start cylinder. Turned and going on the course line I had Pete, Bruce, and Charlie following. We headed under two cu's and did not find any lift. This was not good.

To our north there was a cu-nimb and it was raining hard about 10 to 15 km's away. Down to 1,500' I started turning in 100 fpm. The air was funky in the way that is characteristic of air near cu-nimbs. I got Belinda on the radio and had her go check the radar to see what was up with this storm.

Flipchuk joined me as we worked this bouncy and weak lift and drifted toward the cu-nimb and the rain. Pete didn't find lift with us and headed further toward the cell getting down to 900' before he found lift. Charlie landed. The wind was 12 mph out of the west southwest.

At 2,400' I left the lift that I didn't like and flew toward more cu's to the southeast. Down to 1,500' again and under the fast moving clouds, I started turning in zero sink as I drifted toward the turnpoint. Other pilots came over me not much higher and turned but I was not finding anything worth while.

After fifteen minutes I lost the zero sink and subsequently landed at the turnpoint.

Pilots who came after us stayed higher and got to the turnpoint at about the same time I did, but high enough to get back up under the clouds as the cu-nimb moved off to the east northeast. Pete climbed up downwind of the turnpoint and got up enough to get back west toward the cu's.

Pete, Oleg, Mitch, Rich, and Greg were able to make it make to goal with a stiff headwind.

Three sport class pilots were able to make it to the turnpoint, which was their goal.

https://airtribune.com/ecc2015/results

https://airtribune.com/ecc2015/results/task2/day/class-1-sport

1 Nick Caci Ww Sport 2 155 00:44:20 585
2 Jeff Curtis Ww Sport 2 135 00:45:20 567
3 Knut Ryerson Aeros Discus 00:52:30 483

https://airtribune.com/ecc2015/results/task2/day/class-1

1 Pete Lehmann Wills Wing T2-154 02:20:55 969
2 Oleg Bondarchuk Aeros Combat 12.7 C 02:26:45 902
3 Rich Cizauskas Aeros Combat 02:18:00 895
4 Greg Dinauer Aeros Combat 12.7 02:31:06 867
5 Mitch Shipley Ww T2C 144 02:32:28 850

At 8 PM the thunderstorm struck here at Ridgely.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - three days later »

Tue, Apr 14 2015, 2:04:46 pm EDT

Nice weather after the competition

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air|weather

The weather forecast here.

The weather has actually been pretty nice after the Green Swamp Sport Klassic. Rain in the late afternoon one hate and a little rain at night on the other. Plenty of good flying in competition conditions could have been had (but it would have been a bit nerve wracking. Lots of tandems and single flights here.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 7 »

Sat, Apr 11 2015, 9:29:09 pm EDT

An upwind leg to start off given the conditions and the approaching front

Facebook|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Jeffrey "Jeff" Lawrence Bohl|PG|Quest Air|Wills Wing|Wills Wing T2C

http://www.onlinecontest.org/olc-2.0/para/flightinfo.html?flightId=-1436600459

http://www.onlinecontest.org/olc-2.0/para/getScoring.html?scoringId=319

http://www.paraglidingforum.com/leonardo/flight/1133582

http://wxc.fai.org/module.php?id=22&date=20150304&gliderclass=hg1

http://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:davisstraub/11.4.2015/16:40

http://www.xcontest.org/world/en/ranking-hg-open/

We had a forecast of a 40% chance of rain. We could see on the forecast maps that a front was coming our way. When we looked to the north we could see the milky colored sky. The idea was to have a task that was valid but was short enough that we could get everyone on the ground before any rain showed up.

The visible satellite photo for 12:30 PM. You can see the lack of cu's to our north.

At noon the task committee changed the task because while there were plenty of cu's, there were none then to the north and the milky coloring seemed to be coming a lot nearer. Now the task was to the south to 474 and 33 and then back up to the northeast to the Sawmill turnpoint and back to Quest. The sky to the north filled in with cu's a bit later.

We had expected 7 mph westerly winds, but they were a little stronger, 9 mph to 11 mph and south south westerly. The task committee had abandoned the plan to go to the north to the Grass Roots airfield, so we didn't have a down wind leg to start the task off (the next leg would have been 20 km into the wind), but a 14 km leg into the wind (from the edge of the start cylinder to the north edge of the 3 km cylinder around the turnpoint).

We put a bigger cylinder around the turnpoint so that pilots wouldn't be flying over fields where the owner is less than pleased to have us landing. The edge of the turnpoint cylinder was just east of the Seminole glider port. Right on highway 33.

We started early at 12:30 PM because we felt that the day could end early with rain showers and thunderstorms and we wanted to give pilots the best chance of staying safe. That turned out to be a good call, not that we had any rain.

The first couple of pilots who were towed up didn't stick. I was next and was pulled toward and then flew to the southwest edge of a reasonable looking cu but found no lift. Heading back to the field, down wind, I saw a pilot turning just west of the field and that was 200 fpm. It was early and none of the pilots were getting very high or climbing very fast. We got up to cloud base at 3,800'.

With the south wind we kept drifting back to the north. Finally I had climbed to 3,900' and was at cloud base so I headed south. There was perhaps one pilot out on the course at that point. A few came with me and joined me in thermals to the south of Quest, but as it turned out, still inside the start cylinder (at least at the top of the lift).

I found 200 fpm at 2,600' just outside the start cylinder and drifted back into at 4,100', again at cloud base. Cory was following me and I saw one pilot a little out in front of me lower.

I was on the radio to my team calling out the climbs. Cory was listening. I had turned down the volume on the radio because of some early obnoxious transmission so I wasn't hearing anyone. I forgot that I turned it down, which caused some consternation as I would be the one to stop the task as meet director if there was a safety issue and I needed to hear pilots comments. Turns out there were no safety issues during the day.

There were plenty of cu's along highway 33 and just needed to be sure that I could get to the next one with enough altitude to find the lift. I came in to the lift at 2,000' next to the Seminole field and worked 150 fpm up a little more than a kilometer from the edge of the turnpoint. I needed to get higher before getting the turnpoint. I had to do another thermal to get to 3,500' and high enough to actually get to the turnpoint given that the wind was strong enough to make that difficult.

The sky was still full of cu's and turning around to go back and downwind made things much easier. I found 300 fpm and got to over 4,000'. A 150 fpm thermal 6 kilometers to the north that had three other pilots working up wind around it allowed me to climb up to 3,500', before shooting to the east to get the Sawmill turnpoint.

That looked like enough to make it in so I just kept on gliding and enjoying the tailwind to goal.

About forty minutes later Mick Howard came first into goal on his Wills Wing T2C. The topless gliders are heavily handicapped. David Lopez was next over goal, then Cory and finally Spinner, the Quest Air tandem pilot. That's everyone who made it to goal of the contestants.

Larry came in with David and said let's go back and do the course again but in the opposite direction so he and David did that and were successful.

The first leg was just too much of a headwind for the Sport 2 pilots. So that was a bit unfair. We, of course, try to make each task fair to all the pilots, including the Falcon pilot, so we would not usually include an upwind leg, especially not the first leg.

The cu's were cleared out at about 3:30 or 3:45. It was a good thing that we started early as the end ended so early.

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/daily/day7.html

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/total/day7.html

# Pilot Glider Total
1. Cory Barnwell Wills Wing U2 160 5007.35
2. Mick Howard Wills Wing T2C 144 4075.95
3. Matt Christensen Wills Wing U2 160 3756.62
4. Jeffery Bohl Wills Wing U2 160 3692.01
5. Jim Weitman Moyes Litesport 4 3689.30
6. John Maloney Wills Wing Sport 2 150 3217.33
7. Greg Sessa Wills Wing U2 160 3137.92
8. David Lopez Wills Wing T2C 2992.86
9. Willie Van Caulart Wills Wing Falcon 2 195 2501.97
10. Owen Mcdermott-Berryman Wills Wing U2 2277.73
11. Dana Pasternack Wills Wing Sport 2 2051.27

Replay the flights here: https://airtribune.com/2015-green-swamp-sport-klassic/blog__day_7

Dana, in eleventh, is the leading points person in contention of the US women's national sport class champion. There were three women in the competition.

Cory Barnwell did not have to fly the last day as Mick Howard could not catch him as the most points that he could have scored would be 800 given his handicap. Because of the difficult first leg, the day was not worth 1,000'. Too many pilots landed quite short.

Because this is a sport class only competition the sport class pilots were the focus of the competition and it was very friendly. Because we have a handicap system, we allow in topless gliders and pilots with lower NTSS points and ranking. We just have to keep it fair with an appropriate handicap to allow everyone a chance to do well, but not rely on the glider to give you an edge.

Kim Frutiger raised about a $1,000 for the Cloudbase Foundation with a raffle. Pilots had a great dinner at the Redwing restaurant and a local band played great music.

The winner:

Photo by Adam Bain

Larry and his new glider:

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 6 »

Fri, Apr 10 2015, 9:42:29 pm EDT

One contestant makes it back

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air

Pilots took a relaxed approach but we got in the air quickly. The lift was only 100 fpm until we got high and then it improved. We climbed to 5,000' and cloud base. Plenty of cloud suck at the top. I headed out with Cory and either Matt or Jeff. I moved ahead and kept going past Mascotte to get under nice looking clouds west of highway 33 after a 10 kilometer glide.

The lift was not what I hoped for but I was still well over 3,000'. I went looking for something more than 75 fpm. That just brought me further down and I went on a hard search stopping for just a little over zero at 1,800'. I stayed in it until finally it turned on to 300 fpm and climbed to 4,800'. I had lost the two pilots I was with and hopefully helping.

Plenty of cu's ahead and it was easy to climb high to 5,200' just before the turnpoint at the Turnpike. Cory and another pilot were way north of the Turnpike and Greg and Tom came in under about 1,000' below.

With all that altitude it was easy to head southwest to the next turnpoint. Dave and another pilot were low out on this leg.

When I got to Center Hill I could see a rain shower/cell about 20 kilometers to the west. There was a lot of shading to the west, but still patches of sunlight east of the cell and some dark clouds east of the cell. I flew over the town of Webster at 1,600' and found very sweet lift at 100 fpm in the shade. It was so smooth and there was no gust from the cell to the west. The wind was 4 mph out of the west.

As the cell dissipated I headed out at 4,000' to the west to get the optimized turnpoint at 7 km radius. There was strong lift right at the turnpoint to 4,500'. It looked really good.

With nice clouds ahead I found good lift to 5,300' and headed for the turnpoint at the northeast end of the Green Swamp. I was hoping earlier to get rid of this turnpoint as it was right in line with the last leg and I wanted to go over the Green Swamp instead and there were nice cu's there.

As I approached the next turnpoint I could see that there were very few cu's between it and Quest Air. There was a cu to the right over the Green Swamp but then I saw Cory turning sharply to my northeast over the nursery. I headed for him.

Missed the lift there and the cu next to him disappeared. Ran to the south to get under a cu in the Green Swamp but came in too low and couldn't go too deep into the Swamp. Landed in a long field next to Sloan's Ridge Road at a farm that I very often bicycle past. Had a great time with the farmer and his friends.

Mick Howard made it in. Cory did not. Greg and Larry made it back.

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/daily/day6.html

https://airtribune.com/2015-green-swamp-sport-klassic/blog__day_6

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 6 task »

Fri, Apr 10 2015, 11:33:59 am EDT

Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 6

Triangle task

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air

Turnpike and highway 33 first. Starts at 1:30 PM.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 5 »

Thu, Apr 9 2015, 8:58:58 pm EDT

Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 4

Many personal bests

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air

This mentoring is harder than it looks, at least for me. I got a new team today and my goal was to help out our star women pilot, Dana. I told Dave Lopez that I wasn't going to help him as he made goal yesterday, and therefore I needed to help the people that hadn't made goal yet. I told Cory the same thing and he went to a different frequency. Maybe the guys making goal need to get on one frequency together and not with the mentors. All the mentors agreed that they needed to help out the pilots who weren't making goal.

I also wanted to help Fernando and Willie on the Falcon. Dave, Willie and Dana are easy to spot in the air. Fernando is not.

Our team launched second and I was right with them. There was huge lift right at the end of the field and I pinned off low and climbed out quickly. The launching took all of 33 minutes, or about a minute a pilot. We've got four planes for 30+ pilots.

After 3,000' at 300 fpm the lift slowed down and the gaggle over launch filled in with most of the pilots. We climbed to 3,900' and I had Dana and Dave with me. Fernando I could not find. Willie had been with me but wandered off, I don't know exactly why. Maybe tomorrow I'll be able to ask him.

Dana was just above me and I said let's go toward Mascotte when we got to almost 4,000'. I could see Tom and three other pilots circling there so it was time to get going. She seemed responsive to my suggestions.

She came in low and I could see Willie way low but working lift. Tom, Larry and I were working better lift much higher and it wasn't long before I was at cloud base at 4,700'. Dana was working her way up steadily so I pushed forward to the next clouds to report on what was ahead.

The lift was less than 100 fpm under the next two clouds so after a few minutes and at 4,000' I pushed north northwest downwind to clouds just passed small fires. No lift over the fires but the clouds were working a little. This turned into a general area of lift.

Dana, Tom, Larry, Dave Lopez and four or five other pilots were low and circling. Dana further to the south with a couple of them. I had headed upwind to the east under a cloud street and stayed high.

I went back to Dana three times where she was circling with a few others but there was 400 fpm down above them. I'd go back to the north and tell her that as soon as she felt comfortable she should join us further north to get better lift.

She was finally able to get to where we were and David Lopez and I climbed to 4,800' at 300 fpm. She was about 1,000' below us. At cloud base we headed to the prisons to the north northwest.

Got to the prisons at 4,200' and found light lift. Now the idea was to wait for Dana. David and I were out in front and there was no reason for him to wait. I just needed to wait to stay with Dana. I headed southeast away from the course line hoping that he would get the idea and head off on his own. There were plenty of cu's around.

Losing just three hundred feet on my little glide back I returned to the area of lift but it was not there. I went searching for it under good looking clouds but suddenly there was sink every where.

Now racing to find the lift I lost 2,500' before I hit some weak lift as 1,700' Suddenly there was David Lopez right next to me at my altitude. He apparently had followed me around when I wasn't trying to climb up but wait for Dana.

A few turns that averaged 35 fpm and then I just lost it circling a little to the east of it when it was moving northwest apparently. In 500 fpm down I was quickly on the ground. David found it and climbed up.

The pilots and mentors behind us soon caught up with us and a good number of them made it to goal. As I write this they haven't reported in yet.

Cory, Dave Lopez, Tom, Mick, Matt, Greg and Larry at goal.

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/daily/day5.html

https://airtribune.com/2015-green-swamp-sport-klassic/blog__day_5

Dana continued to do well without my mentoring and undoubtedly had her personal best.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 5 live tracking »

Thu, Apr 9 2015, 12:47:53 pm EDT

Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 5

It's working

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air

https://airtribune.com/2015-green-swamp-sport-k…/blog__day_5

Starts at 1:30 PM EDT.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 5 task »

Thu, Apr 9 2015, 11:29:14 am EDT

Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 5

A personal best day

Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air

Over open areas to the Savana airfield turnpoint, then a leg to the west to keep us out of Ocala airspace, then the field next to Williston airfield. Five kilometer circle around Dunnellon.

114.5 km.

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Green Swamp Sport Klassic - Day 4 »

Wed, Apr 8 2015, 10:49:24 pm EDT

Another fabulous day in paradise

Bob Caldwell|Green Swamp Sport Klassic 2015|Quest Air|Tom Lanning

The task:

Four turnpoints. A zig zag task assuming an east wind. Cu's started popping before the 10 AM pilot meeting. The start time was moved back again to 1:30 PM to make sure that we had plenty of lift for the pilots who launched first.

The forecast was for good lift, the kind we always get here in Florida with a high cloud base and light east winds. So far we have had east winds every day.

Tom Lanning was off first and I was off at about sixth with my team right behind me. There was 100+fpm lift at 1,400' so I pinned off and slowly climbed up to over 4,000' as plenty of pilots joined me just over the launch area. This time I only had to spend 40 minutes over Quest waiting for the team to congeal up at cloud base at 4,600'. Matt, Glen and I took off to the northwest with three pilots in front of us and plenty of cu's along the course line.

I glided 9 km to the nursery west of Mascotte. The three pilots in front turned north at Mascotte and headed for some good looking cu's. Down to 2,200' I turned over the middle of the nursery and found 140 fpm. Matt joined me. We saw Glen low on the east side of the nursery suddenly start climbing well. We shaded over there and found 250 fpm to 4,600' and went on glide for the first turnpoint at Center Hill. Matt was just behind me and I suggested to Glen that he climb up to cloud base before leaving.

It was a 10 km glide to the turnpoint and around to the second leg to a cloud where I saw three pilots, including Larry and Greg turning. I was down to 2,500' before I got to the lift, but I thought that the glide was pretty good at 16:1 with an average sink of 220 fpm. Matt behind me didn't get as good a glide and didn't get the first waypoint before he joined us in the lift.

It was broken and weak at 150 fpm. I watched Larry high head for the next cloud and waited to see if he would turn. I was hanging with Matt and Greg, and Tom was circling just off the deck below us. I headed for Larry when I saw him circling but Matt headed back to the turnpoint. I didn't know at the time that he had not made the turnpoint, so I could not understand what the hell he was doing.

Greg, Jim Weitman and I climbed in Larry's thermal at 300 fpm to 4,600'. I didn't know what was up with Larry, but it turned out that he couldn't help any of his team as his microphone cable was broken. So he was helping Greg help Jim.

As they all headed to the second turnpoint to the south I headed back north to find Matt and get him going. He was circling low over Tom and with David Lopez. They were in weak 60 fpm lift and I came over them and joined them in it. I needed to relax and stay with Matt. Glen was behind but getting slowly to the first turnpoint.

I went south a short distance to a nice looking cloud, found 250 fpm and climbed to 4,600' as they all came in under me. At cloud base I told Matt that I was going to go to the big dark cloud south down the course line and that as soon as he got to cloud base to come join me. After a six kilometer glide I was in 350 fpm with Larry, Greg and Jim who had by then made the turnpoint only 3 km to my south and were back in this nice thermal heading to the next turnpoint to the north northwest.

At 4,800' and cloud base I went south to the turnpoint and then came back to the same area where I got up to find Matt not very high. After fifteen minutes he finally found a nice thermal and we left for the turnpoint, for me again. Glen was there but 1,000' below us as we took the turnpoint and headed back to the north to see if we could find the strong lift one more time.

I found 132 fpm and Matt came over to me as Glen landed just south of us. I climbed to 3,100' and said I'd go look for better lift to the north under good looking clouds. I didn't find it and landed. Matt landed soon thereafter, both of us just short of the third turnpoint.

Larry, Greg, and Jim struggled just south of the Cheryl (third) turnpoint (about where we landed) and Cory caught up with them. Only a few pilots made it into goal.

Bob Caldwell«rcaldwell» writes:

Shot this looking toward Orlando from the gulf coast at 1 EDT. 38,000 ft. Sweet looking sky, hope soaring was great.

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/daily/day4.html

http://soaringspot.com/gss2015/results/club/total/day4.html

https://airtribune.com/2015-green-swamp-sport-klassic/blog__day_4

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